Why isn't ゆく accepted for 行く?

This reading is much less common, but it’s still valid and occasionally used. I feel like it should at least give a warning instead of saying outright wrong.

12 Likes

This is an interesting question, I’d like to know WK’s official answer for it but I want to hazard a guess.

According to a couple posts I read online on the topic, the ゆく reading is much much less common in plain Japanese. It’s often only used in songs and poetry to give a kind of old fashioned or classical kind of feeling. In regular spoken Japanese it’s only really used in set phrases like 行方不明(ゆくえふめい) or 成り行き(なりゆき) or 行き交う人々(ゆきかうひとびと)。

So my guess is WK doesn’t really want to teach a reading that isn’t standard and is very rarely used in regular speech. I completely agree that it should throw you a warning instead of just marking it plain wrong though.

Also, thanks for teaching me something new! I had never come across this reading before. :cookie:

6 Likes

It’s also used in train destination indicators - 東京行き.

10 Likes

Hey @FireSide_01! This is interesting. ゆ is listed as a kun’yomi reading, so I am wondering if this might just be an oversight on our part. My gut feeling is that the content team would probably make ゆく a warning shake, like you and @NeonRabies suggested.

Oh and to add another one, 先行き, which can use both the い and ゆ reading. さきいき・さきゆき、両方も言える. :raised_hands:

I’ll let the team know about this one!

-Nick at WK

11 Likes

Although a separate word is taught for that with that specific definition.
https://www.wanikani.com/vocabulary/行き

1 Like

Not quite related, but can you update the meaning for 拝む? WK says it means to worship, but that definition isn’t quite right. Everything I have seen elsewhere says that the verb more conveys the meaning of, “assuming the position of worship.” Which I think means more folding one’s hands for prayer, rather than the actual prayer itself, for example.

2 Likes

ああああああ!新幹線で聞いた!
I thought I was just mishearing it the whole time, I thought that it was because the う at the end of 東京 made it sound like いう, similar to how 言う when said quickly turns into a ゆ sound.

2 Likes

Hey @Zachary0147 Phew, 拝む is a tough one. I do see what you mean but the Japanese definition 「神仏など尊いものの前で,手を合わせたり礼をしたりして,敬意を表したり祈ったりする。」does seem to embody what the act of ‘to worship’ covers. 拝む can also be used as 謙譲語 (humble speech) for 見る, like ‘to see someone of a high status.’ We include ‘to pray to’ and ‘to see’ as alternative meanings. Are you looking for some context possibly in the meaning section?

-Nick at WK

I think that would be helpful. Especially so people can differentiate between 拝む and other words like 敬う and 祭る.

2 Likes

Great! I will let the content team know about your suggestion to see if they would like to add anything or make any changes to the current content for 拝む!It’s quite a complex word. :sweat_smile:

-Nick at WK

6 Likes

Hmm… It’s interesting that Jisho and other sites say that ゆう is a reading for 言う because when I tried typing ゆう into Windows IME and Android keyboard and neither of them gave me 言う as a suggestion. The way it works in my head is ゆう is how it sounds rather than how it’s “written” if you get me? Similar to 結う being read as いう. I wonder how these readings change based on conjugation? I’ve never heard 言って spoken as ゆって… Though I’m not saying it doesn’t happen.

2 Likes

This matches my experience.

When it’s written as 「ゆう」, I don’t think I’ve seen kanji used. (But maybe it happens?)

image

4 Likes

Because I’ve studied a lot more Kanji than anything else, whenever I come across something that is using only hiragana, my brain absolutely melts…

which kouyuu!

Context is key…

1 Like

Oh yes, good point.

1 Like

So, from what I’ve seen the reading 「ゆう」for 言う is only spoken. Further it’s only for the dictionary form of the verb, so it can be read as ゆう for 言う but not ゆって for 言って.

I’ve definitely heard many kids say ゆって for 言って but I’ve heard it the most when they’re angry at whoever it’s being aimed at. Angry or frustrated at least. It’s a colloquial saying, and I think the one, (or few times if more than 2x) time I saw it written with kanji, they had the ゆ written as ふりがな above it.

7 Likes

Now that I think of it I have heard “ゆったじゃん” by female students. Maybe it’s an age/gender/slang thing?

5 Likes

Others I’ve seen in manga:

ゆった


(This one from the mid-1990s.)

ゆって

image

image

image

6 Likes

That’s fair. I’m parroting what I have heard from Japanese lessons and adult’s speech. It could be that reading is more casual, therefore “improper” Japanese.

2 Likes