What do these words add to this sentence?

An example sentence in WK goes like this:

AIがこんな文も作れるなんて、ライターの私にとっては、世も末ですよ。

Translated as:

It’s the end of the world to me, as a writer, that AI can make a sentence like this.

What kind of meaning does each of these two words add?

  • なんて (is it roughly the same as こと?)
  • とって
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なんて
にとって

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I believe this is にとって,
e.g 私にとって (as for me), used for giving your experience, or the viewpoint of something, of a topic

私にとって、日本語はちょっと難しい。
As for me, I find Japanese a little difficult.

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So does なんて mean “something like” here?
“Something like making such sentences”? I’m failing to get the feel here…

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Yeah, that’s exactly what it means.
I usually see it translated as “something such as X”

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I would say it’s more like など. Also, lol at ライター. I would’ve written 作家 :sweat_smile: .

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The key bit in the dictionary definition is the “expresses disdain, dislike, astonishment, etc” note. In your sentence it is doing some grammar work to join the two parts together, equivalent to ことは or のは or similar, but the reason for the writer picking なんて here is the emotional overtones.

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Yeah, basically. It’s where the “like this” in the translation is coming from.

I guess that shows you’re not an AI. Just to check, though, what does this say?

eGoooott

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