Vocabulary 十つ is missing

It seems that the vocabulary 十つ (ten things) is missing. For all other counters, 十 seems to be included (e.g. 十日, 十月) but not for つ.

So how do I pronounce 十つ? Is とおつ correct?

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As far as I’m aware, there’s no such word (there might have been one, but I’m not aware of that either). The next one after 九つ is actually just 十, pronounced as とお. Wanikani can’t have two items with the same kanji writing in the database at once, so they prioritised “ten” the number, over “ten things”.

ETA: you can read more about it here:

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What does ETA mean here? The only meaning I know of is “estimated time of arrival”.

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Edited to add!

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Any time I see an acronym I don’t know, I try to google for it. But if it’s not the most common usage, this search is useless, because it leads to pages like this.

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nods the urban dictionary is useful occasionally:

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I was wondering the same thing the other night, why they didn’t have it.

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What they could do though is add it as another reading in 十 and add a description in both the meaning and reading mnemonic about it. They already do that for other words.

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When looking at a book of mine that covers some historical/archaic aspects of the language it appears 10 dose not have the trailing tu/ti.

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When two words are spelled the same with kanji but have different readings based on when the meaning is different, they just ignore one of those combos. It’d be nice if they could handle it though.

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Oh man, that’s amazing. What book is it?

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That’s gotta be some of the weirdest romaji I’ve ever seen.

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It’s not weird romaji, it’s historical Japanese phonetics!

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Historical Japanese phonetics written in weird romaji. :wink:

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Not really. Tsu and chi used to be tu and ti before they got softened (something similar happened in romance languages with c and g - “Cicero” used to be pronounced as Kikero), and likewise du and di. I don’t know what sound the capital F signifies, but it’s not the same f in modern Japanese - the h row used to be something else – I wouldn’t be surprised if it signified a heavily aspirated p, considering most if it turned into h, except for fu. を used to be pronounced as wo, so that explains the w in töwö, and the umlaut is probably a different o sound than modern Japanese.

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It still pretty much closely follows existing romanization methods. However, since this includes sounds that don’t exist, by that simple fact one is going to have to extend the romanization method. Like how would you expect someone to write no longer used words whose phonetics have changed over time. Even if you wanted to write these with Japanese characters instead of some form of romanization you have a problem. The problem being those sounds are no longer match any Japanese characters, so even in native Japanese you would need some non-standard notation or reading.

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It’s this book right here.

Mainly, got it after a friend recommended it to me since the history can explain some modern irregularities you see, and I find that interesting. Although, I have only read a few chapters mainly the Grammar and Syntax chapter, and browsed through others.

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image

õwõ

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Lol sigh now when I look at that page, I can’t help but notice it.

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They did it with いちにち and ついたち, though.