Your Name in Japanese

I sign my calligraphy as 守禎冕(ステーベン)- because I used to practice several martial arts(守), [try to] feel blessed (禎)and the etymology of my western name is “crown”(冕). Turning names into kanji (based on a combination of pronunciations and meanings) has actually been a little business of mine since 2008. :grin:

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My name is Sara, and back in high school Japanese class it was セラ, but personally I like サラ a bit better.

I know that non-Japanese people don’t use kanji for their names, but I get a kick out of the idea that my name would be 皿…きれいなかんじですね!

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welcome @Darkry and @Sjeagen! @joeni pls?

my first name does not work with japanese. if i went there, i think i’d use my second name, which actually sounds japanese: ユナ it actually sounds closer to its breton original than the french pronunciation of it with the japanese ゆ sound.

lol and your chibi version would be 小皿 and your showering self 皿洗い!

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My calligraphy teacher chose kanji for my calligraphy seals (which I carved from stone blocks) based off the meaning of my full name, which means “the archer” (or “warrior” if you take it more generally). I can’t recall the kanji now completely, would have to get those seals out again. I do remember it contained the first kanji for the town since the first sound for both my name and the town is the same. My teacher and the other students were super excited about that!

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I thought it was マルテ for a long time. But my Japanese teacher wrote マーテ on all my emails, so I have used that since. :grinning:

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はい!

\textcolor{pink}{\huge \textsf{WELCOME! ^-^}}
@Darkry and @Sjeagen

welcome gif - crabigator

Take the time to check out the FAQ and GUIDE if you haven’t already.

There’s also a lot of good stuff on the forum to help you, like:

The Ultimate Guide for WK
The Ultimate Additional Japanese Resources List!
The New And Improved List Of API and Third Party Apps

I hope your Japanese learning journey goes well and that you enjoy your time with us on the forums.

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Transcribing “Patrick” into Japanese syllables is a bit of a nightmare.

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Seems like パトリック is the closest fit, perhaps.

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Mine turns out alright…ジョセフ。

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Mines nice and simple! ギャビン

Edit I guess it could be ギャヴィン as well, but the first was how I wrote it when I took Japanese waaay back in high school. My teacher was okay with it, so I’ll stick with it!

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エリック

Pretty easy, though I would not have guessed the double consonant on my own. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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Thanks :slight_smile:
I love your second name. Every character with that name in anime is my favourite each time :smiley:
Edit- Also Yuna (as from SAO) has so awesome songs… even so people don’t like SAO that much nowadays, those songs are still epic.

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i have an L and a V in my name, yay!

the one that would be closest in terms of how it’s written would be リーヴェ, however リーブ more similar in pronunciation and it also looks nicer, so i’ve been using that one :stuck_out_tongue:

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I’ve got a Chinese name that generally appears before my English name on official documents, but I’ve always wondered if I ought to use it if I end up staying in Japan or if I should just transcribe my English name using katakana. (I mean, foreign residents need to register at the municipal office, right?) 得恩 gets read as とくおん using on’yomi (which is the convention for Chinese names), but that’s also the name of a temple (徳恩寺), which incidentally contains the most common way people miswrite my name in Chinese since 得恩 isn’t a typical Chinese name at all. (Chinese names are usually one or two characters that represent desirable qualities. My name is a little phrase that means ‘to receive grace/blessings’.) I also wonder how Japanese people would find my name, because I’m pretty sure no Japanese name sounds like that.

To be honest, both names are mine, so I’d like to keep both even if I’m fine with going by only one. I wonder what Japanese people with, say, a Christian name or a foreign parent do about their ‘other name’. At the worst, however, I’ve got a backup plan my friend gave me: come up with a 名乗り読み and read 得 as え, which gives us えおん. The problem: it’ll make me sound like some chuunibyou anime character. :joy:

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Gavin? My fiance’s name is also Gavin and I translated his name for him as ガビン. So many different ways to spell it!

My name is Hannah, but I’ve gone by both ハンナ and はな. I’ve been tempted to use Kanji recently… I’d probably do 華子 [はなこ]. It’s pretty and simple, and also the name of Ash Ketchum’s mom in Japanese Pokemon!

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Mine is ピラー but some Japanese friends call me ピリ I think it’s cute! My name is originally Pilar! guess what makes it hard to translate is the finishing “r”

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妹と同じ名前! But we shorten it to ミキ instead of ミカ.

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チアゴ sounds right to me!

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クリスチャン here.

Accidentally got it written as クリスちゃん once by an embarrassed HelloTalker :slight_smile:

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I think パベル would work best, maybe?

ポール is actually pronounced Pooru, with a long o sound in the middle.

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