Why is this wrong?

It shows the correct reading on the left and I type it in correctly but it marks my answer as red as if it was wrong. I am just confused.

Oh, I think it should be

jyuu (じゅう)

Rather than:

jiyuu (じゆう)

Note the size difference in the ゆ

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So, the only difference I see in those two typings is that the “yu” is bigger in the second one. How do I type it in those two ways? And what is the difference?

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It would also affect pronunciation.

I typed it in English/Romanji before each entry:

jyuu gets you the small ゆ

Your answer would be jiyuu

More on these ‘little hiragana’ here (don’t know the actual term for them):

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As @PongyiFan said, the ゅ is different from the ゆ
ゅ itself is not really a letter on its own, rather the combination with the letter in front of it makes it one whole new letter. You can do this with よ(ょ), ゆ(ゅ), や(ゃ).

じゅ is the letter jyu
きょ is the letter kyo
ひゃ is the letter hya

Also important to note, つ also has a little version: っ.
This functions as a glottal stop, meaning that you pause for a beat in the middle of a word.

ぜっぴ = zeppi (ze–pi)

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Thanks everyone for the help these are all really helpful.

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Does everybody here actually type jyu instead of ju?

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Nope.

I mean, I don’t even type the S in “tsu” any more - why would I bother with a superfluous Y? :stuck_out_tongue:

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I do :flushed: I got used to typing the y as well

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There are enough letters already to be adding more on top that serve no purpose. :confounded:

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Yeah, I’ve boiled it down to the basics by now. つ = tu. し = si. づ = du. ち = ti. Plus the whole ju vs jyu thing.

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I’m flabbergasted as well.

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I write つ = tu and づ = du but when I tried ち = ti and し = si, I started to write ちゃ = ta and しゃ = sa and others. Now, I just shorten つ and づ.

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Yeah, those would have to be written “tya” and “sya” in Nihon-Shiki romanization, so no savings there.

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You need to do if for myu nyu syu etc, so it’s just automatically built into my typing I guess :sweat_smile:

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I usually do those cha and sha, but then I learned hepburn romanization in class, so…

I also do the y way sometimes, though

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i’ve experimented with other short spellings but considering し is just shi in english… and the sh sound is already represented by sh… using “si” to type it is not happening.

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It’s more about the a ka sa ta na, etc., rows.

You would logically think (and a student in the class I’m going to did) that it’s si し, ti ち, and tu つ.
Even if they know how it’s pronounced.

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