What's the closest equivalent to writting PS at the end of a letter?

My guess (based on the fact that google translate just spits half the things I type back in katakana) is that a large chunk of english mannerisms has been integrated into the sun origin language - as shown by the question and interrogation marks. Therefore, I wouldn’t be surprised if japanese people found writting PS to be a normal thing.

However, I am searching for the closest equivalent IN japanese. For… reasons. ¯\(ツ)

Anyone knows what that is? (And if they actually use ps?)

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“追伸” or “追”. The English “PS” will also be recognised, apparently.

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By the way, for stuff like this, you can find the Wikipedia page in English and then open the Japanese version from there. It doesn’t always work of course, but it’s pretty handy.

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That’s exactly what I did.

Giving away my secrets. :stuck_out_tongue:

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…please elaborate? :neutral_face:

Not seanblue but it’s a trick I use a lot too:

clicking this:

goes to this:

It’s a quick way to get a Japanese encyclopedia entry on something even if you don’t know what the concept is called in Japanese. Pretty cool!

Admittedly only 100% practical when comfortable scanning walls of impenetrable text in the language but OK with a translator in a jiff too.

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I never realized this bar on the left was a thing. I tried this a few times by changing EN in the url to something else but it obviously almost never worked so when sean suggested it I was like uuh that’s not a thing

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It’s definitely one of those things it’s easy to just never notice until you have a reason to! Language options in stuff like Steam are similar and I’ve definitely gone a real long time in the past not realizing those existed either.
Happy to help!

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That would require the thing in the other language to have exactly the same title as in English. It probably works sometimes, like with famous people’s names in languages that use latin characters, but for almost anything else it’s going to be different, even if slightly.

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