Wanikani test

how do you lowercase the つ for the kanji word three things?
i put down m- tsu- tsu to lower the middle つ but its not working.

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You can just double the t, so you’d type “mittsu”

You can also do “xtsu” to get the small っ – here’s a Japanese typing guide you can check out if you’re interested ^^

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thanks MssMisc

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By the way, MssMisc’s tip about double-t works for all “small tsu” double consonants, e.g., typing kka will yield っか.

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image

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com-crop

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Dang, can’t like your own post xD

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typing double of the next consonant is definitely the fastest way to do it, and you are essentially typing out what the word sounds like, so it makes sense to me when I’m typing.

MssMssc. :stuck_out_tongue:

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I found this page that explains it well.
https://ocw.mit.edu/resources/res-21g-01-kana-spring-2010/hiragana/hiragana-double-vowels-and-double-consonants/

What always worries me is this is something that should be leaned before starting a platform like wanikani.
Most resources ive seen teach you these right after/during teaching hiragana and katakana

Its important to know how this this changes the pronunciation
いつか i tsu ka
いっか i Ka
with a empathist on the K

Hope that helps ^-^

One of other problems you might come across later is writing づ as in “dzu” (I sure came across that).

Writing “du” works fine for that one, just remember it’s not the real pronounciation :slight_smile:

So, did we pass the test?

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ミスミスクは合格しました。

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Sure it’s the real pronunciation, just not in English phonology. In Japanese romaji phonetics “du” is pronounced the same as “づ” because the English pronunciation doesn’t exist in Japanese.
You can see a lot of examples of this in Japan, where romanized versions of Japanese words read strangely to native English speakers. This often happens in names, where you see things like:
かたふち -> Katafuti
つよし -> Tuyosi

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Speaking of problems shifting words between English and Japanese phonologies, this always struck me as funny: words that end in T in English often end it ト if they’re put in katakana. For example front is rendered as フロント (meaning of course the front desk at a hotel). So when Japanese people try to say the name of my city, Toronto, while speaking English, it sometimes comes out as Toront because they assume it follows that same pattern. This is becoming less common as Toronto becomes more well-known in Japan.

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ミスミス! :durtle_officer:

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I usually do double letters (eg: tt, kk), but x for small sounds (a, i, u, e, o) if it doesn’t automatically set it

fyi in Javanese, “misuh-misuh” (with “H” though, but not ミスフミスフ, still more like ミスミス), means “complain”. Eg. MssMssc misuh-misuh ae. Means MssMssc complains everywhere.

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Elon Misc

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