Translating "WaniKanian English" into English thread


#1

I have learnt much English vocab from WaniKani…


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#2

What is?

  1. Splinter
  2. Instigate

#3

Here, splinter is a pop culture reference to a character from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Instigate means to provoke, to cause something to start

EDIT: But… it says what splinter is in the mnemonic, I just realized. What was your confusion?


#4

I’ve never gotten around to watching the Lord of the Rings, so Wanikani filled me in on some missing pop culture knowledge. In the Lego Batman movie when the eye of Sauron appeared I was like, “Hey!! I know that’s a thing now!” I should probably just watch those movies at some point though haha.


#5

Sorry. I forgot to google Splinter.


#6

So, wait… the english word ‘splinter’ isn’t the same as the dutch word? Then what’s a little piece of wood stuck under your skin called in english?


#7

You’re describing… a splinter.

But they must have figured that Splinter is more effective for mnemonics than splinter.


#8

ooohh alright. I guess Splinter is indeed more memorable than a piece of wood X]


#9

I’ve learned a lot about spelling from Wanikani. :slight_smile:

These days with autocorrect, it’s not important to be able to spell words correctly. And even though the wanikani system is rather generous with English spelling, for me I’ve gotten words wrong because I mistyped them horribly enough

‘camouflage’ was the most recent one.


#10

Yeah and if you’re not an English native it’s even better… like what even is a cleat xD sometimes I get new radicals and I’m not even sure what they mean but I memorize them anyway.


#11

^ For that word, I added Stud as a synonym.


#12

“Chrysanthemum” ftw


#13

Top 3 (I’m sure there are more) words I learned from Wanikani as a non-native speaker of English,

  1. Boisterous
  2. Filial
  3. Piety

#14

I don’t know if I learned any new words, but I realised I cannot spell bureaucrat to save my life.

(Didn’t mean to reply to you)


#15

Even as a native english speaker, i’m relearning alot about grammar / learning new words or even realising i didn’t know i was spelling some words wrong all my life.
Thanks mr crabigator


#16

Even as a native speaker such as myself, I constantly misspell 40 (fourty/forty). Good thing Wanikani doesn’t berate me for not spelling correctly, I don’t think any amount of conditioning would help with (fourty/forty) thing.


#17

I wonder how many native english speakers knew what “filial piety” is. I certainly did not…


#18

cleat is the sharp bits on the bottom of certain sports shoes like football/soccer shoes. they are there to help keep your feet from slipping on the grass.


#19

I knew that only due to having read alot about religions when I was young. I was fascinated by the variety around the world and read on confucianism a fair amount. having said that, i definitely still had to refresh my memory on the term when it popped up here again. not exactly something we use in every day conversations lol


#20

I learned about “filial piety” in college in a world literature class that involved various Chinese texts. The professor loved to talk about filial piety. I definitely wouldn’t have known it had it not been for that class.