To the people using Google Docs


#1

Quick thing I’d like to share with y’all. If you’re a Google doc user ( for etc Kanji or vocab ), be sure to turn off TaperMonkey or any other script browser plugin, it literally breaks Google docs.

It’s common sense, really, but it took me 30 minutes to find the problem.  

( My tip, steer away from scripts that add stuff to your webpage, dynamically. )


#2

Google docs breaks enough on its own so I can imagine having anything extra would mess it up pretty bad.


#3
JackTsuchiyama said... Google docs breaks enough on its own so I can imagine having anything extra would mess it up pretty bad.
 Trying to insert Japanese characters in a table would return a max int, followed by an alert pop-up returning the kana/kanji character, which would then render all doc functions useless. Pretty bad indeed hehe

#4

Why not simply disable greasemonkey on the google docs domain? You aren’t using it there anyway.
Even better, enable it only where it’s being used, which should be your behavior by default; excepting scripts made to be loaded everywhere.


#5
horusscope said... Why not simply disable greasemonkey on the google docs domain? You aren't using it there anyway.
Even better, enable it only where it's being used, which should be your behavior by default; excepting scripts made to be loaded everywhere.
 How would you disable the app per domain?

#6

Greasemonkey has a ‘Global Excludes’ list option.
Tampermonkey has a ‘Blacklisted Pages’ list option. (Hidden in default ‘Config mode’ = ‘Novice’)


#7

Oh, thanks! :smiley:


#8

Uh…It doesn’t break my google docs…


#9

Presumably it is not Greasemonkey itself breaking the page for people, but some specific UserScript that is set to run globally.
So if you don’t have any UserScripts running on google docs, of course GM shouldn’t have any effect.


#10

Not all of us understand how scripting works. 


#11
Aleithian said... Not all of us understand how scripting works. 
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*


#12
horusscope said...
Aleithian said... Not all of us understand how scripting works. 
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*
*tries not to explain how scripting works*

 I likely wouldn't be able to follow your wise teaching. My wisdom lies elsewhere. ;-)

#13

Greasemonkey is (mostly…) just a javascript injection browser-extension.
UserScripts have ‘@include’ and optionally ‘@exclude’ lines in their headers.
GM looks at these lines in all the UserScripts you install, and determines which scripts to inject every time you load a page.
If you click on the Greasemonkey or Tampermonkey menu button it will show you a list of UserScripts that apply to the current page and whether they are enabled or disabled currently.


#14

Well, here’s information you guys who would read this thread could benefit from, in terms simple enough that someone who knows too much could argue with the technicalities of the language… those same technicalities that could potentially alienate a fresh understanding.

Javascript is words that are read continuously.
Each tab can contain them, as you may have observed by now, from pages whose words do not pollute the others.
This running may become aware of its own context, and may be changed at any time.
You can observe such changes as when you submit an answer in a review.
How it is now is called the state.
Anyone is free to add words to the passages which run, you may even enter such passages in your URL bar.
When you add these things, you are free to limit their existence to particular places, such as a specific website where it might be useful.
These passages can alter the appearance of the display, or even submit forms in the background.
They can even respond to changes in themselves and inputs or other events.
To clarify, a form is named as what it is in reality, such as a tax form. You submit information some place. Such as a username and password.
If something is written for a specific purpose and then exists elsewhere, it could easily result in chaos.
As such, it’s practical for the script itself to limit its existence to a particular domain, though this may not always be the case.
In the case of greasemonkey and friends, each script can be configured in the greasemonkey UI to only activate in certain domains.
I’m not sure if I’ve said too much or too little.


#15

Thanks to both of you for your explanations. 


#16

Honestly, explaining it to someone who doesn’t understand how any of it works likely won’t help. Though the documentation example is so bloody simple it should be understood from a glance: http://wiki.greasespot.net/Include_and_exclude_rules


#17
Aleithian said... Not all of us understand how scripting works. 
 As mentioned, script that add something dynamically ( be it colours to Kanji, or converting words to kanji ), it could break a page.

Thanks to this thread, I now know how to blacklist stuff. Thanks!: _)