This kind of thing is infuriating

I get that you can never guess all of the stupid variations someone might write in a meaning the first time they review a new lesson, but it’s still annoying. I should just laugh at myself and move on, but I miss the wording of a meaning more than I’d like to admit the first couple of reviews, even if what I write is functionally the same. I don’t suppose this happens to anyone else…

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Honestly this kind of thing is what drives people to scripts like double check, some of the items can have a lot of synonyms so you could pick a different one every time and add it to the synonyms list and still find more.

But even without third party apps, you can add your preferred phrasing to the user synonyms and avoid that phrase being marked wrong next time.

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Just get double check and hold back on betraying yourself by just marking things correct if you actually want to learn those words. Still, if you do, no problem. If you know 100 words less in the end from SRS, is that really a problem? You know a ton of words anyway by then (and probably will have learned those “missing” words through content consumption anyway if you actually start to consume content). :slight_smile:

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No, I’ll just learn the words. It bothers a lot me for half an hour, at most, and then I move on. If I see a kanji or vocabulary word one extra time because I wasn’t good enough at playing “mind of the teacher”, so what? I want get through the levels fast, yes, but I actually want to learn the words. So, I’ll just keep at it and try not to let my perfectionism get the better of me.

That said, what’s double check?

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I’ve added user synonyms before, but I didn’t realize that doing so made the those synonyms acceptable. Good to know. Obviously, I haven’t spent much (any) time on the forums since I started six weeks ago.

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[Double-Check]

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You do you, as long as it stays fun, everything is fine. :slight_smile:

The other comments covered some solutions and I definitely understand the overall point you’re making about the frustration with synonyms sometimes, but in an effort to help you avoid incorrectly learning the meaning of the vocabulary in question, I would like to point out that “no help for it” does not mean the same thing. It is not a synonym in this case.

“No help for it” means there is no help available for something. For example, you might say a software program has no help (available) for it.

On the other hand, “can’t be helped” or “it’s no use” refers to an unpleasant or painful situation, or an unwanted duty the cannot be avoided and must be accepted.

Those are two very, very different meanings.


EDIT: As @pm215 pointed out in one the replies, “no help for it” is apparently a very specific regional colloquial way to phrase it. Feel free to disregard as I was incorrect.

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Nah, it’s definitely some kind of regional variant, but I couldn’t say what region. UK, maybe. That said, it might mean something closer to “we have no other choice but to X” (rather than the “X cannot be avoided” meaning of “it can’t be helped”).

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Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary and Thesaurus:

there’s no help for it : idiom, mainly UK
there is no other choice in this situation:
“If you catch them stealing again, there’ll be no help for it but (= except) to call the police.”

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Huh, I never realized this was a UK-ism. I guess I’ve just consumed so much British media over the course of my life that I just assumed everyone knew and used this phrase.

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Not only is it from the UK, I think it may only be common in certain areas of the UK. I’ve not heard it myself.

Also, if it’s anything to go by, I have done the same kind of thing @elezraita ! I’ve started adding my own synonyms into ones where that happens!

Edit: One thing I also did recently was change the synonyms of months, so I can use the shorthand for them, Jan, Feb, Mar… Etc. Saves a bit of time :sweat_smile:

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I’d be too paranoid of there being some other word that has a slightly different meaning than the current word to add my guess to synonyms so usually I just take the L and try to remember it next time.

I second the double check userscript though, especially if you’re prone to typos like me… Just be strict with yourself with how often you use it and it’ll be fine.

Yeh, I’ve never heard this phrasing used ever. We would always say, can’t be helped. Must be a very specific part of the UK!

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Weird, I’ve heard it in Ireland on the other hand

Your answer is bad.

I would think that idioms and regional slang phrases would fall outside of the category of expected default handled synonyms. How would one even compile the “complete” set? I would not expect “and Bob’s your uncle” to be accepted for 手軽。Or “hydro” for 電力. Of “two-four” for a case of beer (if that was a vocab that was available).

The only correct answer is “slab”. :stuck_out_tongue:

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I wasn’t saying I thought this should or should not be in the default synonym list; I was just responding to the idea that the phrase “no help for it” doesn’t have that meaning in English, by providing a reference showing that it does. (The current primary meaning “can’t be helped” is of course itself an idiom.)

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I’m beginning to question the assertion that it’s just from the UK. I’ve heard a lot of times over the course of my life, and I don’t live anywhere near the UK. My guess is that it’s somewhat fallen into disuse, as my household/community tends to be a bit old fashioned, and we read a lot of old books and historical fiction. I probably heard it from my parents and grandparents. Who knows? I’m just surprised so few people have ever heard this usage. I seems, if not super common, at least normal to me. To be fair, “it can’t be helped” also isn’t a super common English construction in modern times.

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