Particle practice?

Hoping you might be able to help.

Any idea where I can find a website, app, book or another service to test me on choosing the correct particle for a sentence?

Ideally for N5 level. I am using bunpro already and that’s great, but I want loads of example questions where the particle is blanked out and you need to choose the correct answer or answers.

I’m broadly there with understand the basic particle usage, but I just want a ton of practice questions to do on the train.

Many thanks for all help you can offer.

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I don’t know of any ready made fill in the blanks, but you can make your own!

Copy the sentences from whatever workbook your using without the particles, and there you go.

Just make sure you let the sentences rest for a couple days (or whatever time depending on your short term memory) before filling them back in, so you are not just doing it from memory.

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I’ve been using these: http://www.jlpt.jp/e/samples/sample12.html

You can choose whichever level you want, and download the grammar exercises.

There’s also these: https://japanesetest4you.com/category/jlpt-n4/jlpt-n4-grammar-test/

This also seems good enough: https://www.nihongomaster.com/jlpt-n4-practice-test

Just adjust the level to whatever you’re trying to do.

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Yes, there’s an app for that, quite good, actually. It’s called Japanese Particles Master. I have it for android, not sure if there’s an iOS version. It also shows conjugations.

Edit: If you like books, there’s also this great book with example sentences for each particle covered.

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I think the approach you should take is look at the grammar tests on something like Renshuu.org or the other sites that were listed here and in the Ultimate Resource thread in the forums. One issue you will come across is that the problems aren’t all going to be particle practice. Since particle usage is linked to certain grammar it may be best to practice it more wholistically (i.e., looking at the common grammar used with certain particles) and use the Japanese particles book that was suggested as a reference for forms you come across in your studies.

Besides that, reading and listening helps with finding the patterns of how particles are used. I suggest using apps like HelloTalk to produce your own sentences and have them corrected. This helped me a lot with my particle usage. If you’re not confident with writing sentences, I enjoyed using this book to help with more in depth explanation about certain constructions. (It’s available on the US Amazon; I can’t say about other countries’ Amazon sites)

I have this book, and it’s a great reference guide for the various uses of particles. @Gabrielmpf may already know this, but unfortunately @leneux there aren’t any practice exercises included.

I took a look at the “Japanese Particles Master” application and wanted to provide feedback to those considering using it. In a nutshell, it’s a start to get a basic grasp of some particles, but lacks depth in the various overlap that cause learners to struggle and variety of both particles and questions. So in my book “master” is a misnomer. Hopefully that developer will include more practice exercises and addition particles in future updates. (@Gabrielmpf, I didn’t include this part to knock your recommendation. I commented for those who may not know better: they can walk into the app knowing that there’s more to particle use than what the app offers).

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If you have the Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar (a highly recommended resource) you might be happy to know that they released their first workbook for the series.

It is made to practice in real sentences those grammar points covered in the series (the first volume).
I was very fond of this series of grammar dictionaries not so long ago, so I can only expect this book comes as great news to anyone planning to go over a review on grammar :+1::+1:

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Dictionary of Japanese Particles has around fifty pages of “fill in the blanks” at the back of the book along with an answer key.

No problem :wink:
I think it’s a good start to get to know many of the most important particles. Of course it does not go in depth, and I agree it does need more practice sentences. Both books about particles suggested here are great resources.

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