Most recent non-WK kanji you've learned?

猪突猛進ー(ちょとつもうしん)“Headlong rush” “Rushing recklessly” (Definition according to jisho)

A pen pal showed me this kanji a month or so ago, I quite like it. Not sure I’d ever use it at all, but eh

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In volume 3 of 本好きの下剋上, 桁違い comes up. Maybe you can guess what it means. :slight_smile:

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臥薪嘗胆 (がしんしょうたん). Can be shortened to 嘗胆 (preserving Chinese syntax) or 胆を嘗む (Japanese syntax, read as いをなむ) with the same meaning.
Source: Haganai NEXT
Meaning:

  • To take great pains and make great efforts to destroy an enemy (original meaning)
  • To make great efforts to to achieve a goal

I already knew this proverb in Chinese, but I didn’t know it existed in Japanese too.
Origin: During the Spring and Autumn Period in China, the Kingdom of Yue was defeated by the Kingdom of Wu, and the King of Yue was taken prisoner. In order to keep himself motivated to avenge his nation, the king slept on firewood every night, and took a gall bladder before every meal and before he slept (because it was bitter, like his condition). Eventually, the Kingdom of Yue made a comeback and defeated the Kingdom of Wu.

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I was familiar with おかず( お菜)but not 惣菜. The dictionary has both as ‘side dish’ but my understanding is that 惣菜 is more of a store sold pre-made side dish while お菜 is a homemade dish I believe.

I came across 梳かす today to comb, brush (hair) but likely 梳 is not used much.

I just watched a Detective Conan episode where they talked about よみがえる (to be revived). The かえる part made sense to me but I was curious to see how よみ is written (for sure it is not 読み, right?)
Turns out it has its own kanji altogether:

蘇る

This is a Jinmeiyou kanji which means “be resuscitated”, “revived”, and surprisingly also “perilla / shiso” (you may have seen its beautiful leaves as a tasty decoration for Japanese dishes).
Why it has these two very different meanings is beyond my imagination, though.

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This is one of those “special” kanji where the reading was derived from another combination of words/kanji. In this case, it’s derived from 黄泉から帰る.

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Ah thanks, that explains the reading!

Now why would they use the same kanji for the plant? :thinking: It’s an annual plant, and maybe it’s quite the pest, so that it feels like each year it returns from the underworld to haunt the gardens? :rofl:

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Hahaha. Maybe? All I know is that in Chinese, it means ‘to regain consciousness’, among other things. Kind of like ‘to return to one’s senses’.

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If I understand correctly the plant meaning appear in only one word 紫蘇, and according to the japanese wikipedia it come from a late Han dynasty Chinese story in which a young man almost died due to eating too much crab and getting food poisoning, but a famous doctor saved him with a medicine based on a purple plant. The young man was instantly cured and so the purple plant was named 紫蘇 (purple revive)

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I rarely attempt to read Japanese, but I did recently come across 糞 (BS) while attempting to read some Youtube comments.

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Amazingly I just saw used as the particle まで.

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Yeah, I see this in waiting rooms, or on the slips they give you to take a number and wait sometimes.

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Just encountered 閨 for the first time. ねや, a (married couple’s) bedroom.

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忖 was one I recently came across that I don’t think was on WK.

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In 忖度?

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Yep lmao. From what it looked like, there weren’t really any other words in modern japanese that used it either

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邁 from the word 邁進 (まいしん, pushing forward bravely). A student at my school did calligraphy of it.

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Not an exciting kanji, but 抉 in 抉じ開ける (こじあける, to wrench open, to pry open)

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I’m lazy and don’t note down all the new kanji I come across but some that stand out (or cropped up a few times)

餅 もち - mochi

頬っぺた ほっぺた - cheek

揃える そろえる - to complete

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I think this is more accurately ‘to gather together/collect’. ‘To complete’ is not wrong, but I think it’s just an extension: when you finally ‘gather’ all the items in a complete set, then you’ve ‘completed’ the set.

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