Looking through a novel


Was curious if the line that is highlighted in the image meant that the kana was repeated? I haven’t had much experience with novels.

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Is the question about the marks next to the kana?

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Do you mean, do the marks next to the kana mean they’re repeated? Those marks are just there for emphasis, similar to underlining or italics in English

Update: Kana do have an iteration/repitition mark (ゝ), though it goes after the kana just like the kanji iteration mark (々). It’s not very common though and I’ve yet to come across it

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Yep, like @enbyboiwonder says, they’re like italics in an English book. They’re called 傍点 if you were curious!

edit to reply to update:

I see this all the time in old texts (ex, Aozora Bunko), but I think it has fallen out of fashion for modern writing.

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In some books that are more meant for children or teens, it can also mean that the marked part is a single word, so they don’t get confused trying to understand where the words are. But seeing how there’s a very similar phrase also marked on the right, it’s probably some kind of emphasis

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Oh yes, it was for the marks next to the kana. Thank you all, seems to be
for emphasis then. Appreciated. :slight_smile:

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