Languages after Japanese

Hi guys I’m just curious what language you guys hope to learn after Japanese? I’ve started to realise that asian languages are extremely interesting so I might go with something like Cantonese but I’m not entirely sure yet.

11 Likes

Probably chinese. Not sure yet. But only once I’m damn near native in japanese, which will probably take another five years at this pace.

8 Likes

I have a list of languages that I want to learn in the future. Most of them are East Asian or South East asian. The order would be something like:
Korean
Mandarin
Cantonese
Thai - I’m half Thai but don’t speak it, but I’m so disconnected from the culture, learning the language isn’t super attractive yet.
Vietnamese

This is definitely within a span of probably decades though. I don’t want to move on from a language until I can at least read a real novel in it, so that’s gonna be tough I think. Japanese has been with me on and off for a bit more than 4 years so far and I can sort of read children’s stories by now. But, it’s also the first language I’m learning “consciously” - if that makes sense. If I just trust in the process for my next language, which I didn’t do for Japanese until fairly recently, it will hopefully not take as long.

6 Likes

The school i work on need a German teacher in a few years, so I hope I can get paid to study German in the near future :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

7 Likes

Mandarin. I’m already casually learning it, but my focus and priority is still Japanese until I consider myself fairly proficient in the language.

As for why Mandarin specifically? Because I’m ethnically Malaysian-Chinese, and a lot of my relatives don’t speak or have a poor command of English. Plus there’s a huge Chinese-speaking population here in Australia, as well as there being many Chinese tourists (well, before COVID, anyway).

5 Likes

Aside from Japanese, I’m learning German right now, but I also want to learn Polish and Hungarian/Finnish at some point in the future because I really like the sounds of them :v

สู้ๆ! Hoping you give Thai a try :smiley: it’s not that awful once you try speaking it, but the written language is another beast entirely.

3 Likes

After I master Japanese. I want to learn either Mandarin, Cantonese, or Korean.

Don’t do it bro.

2 Likes

How do you go about studying Mandarin at the same time? Do you find you mix up the chinese characters? I want to mess around with Cantonese but I’m afraid to mix up the languages :laughing:

1 Like

You’re not my mom >:(

Also why not?

3 Likes

Maybe spanish. Seems easy enough as a portuguese speaker, and I’d love to talk with my comrades in the neighborhood lol

2 Likes

I’ll try to deepen my English. I use mainly business english (globish) and have poor grammar.

2 Likes

I’m sure my situation’s a lot different from other Chinese learners — as in I already have some background knowledge (albeit no speaking skill at all) and I knew simple hanzi before beginning to learn Japanese and kanji. But I find my brain responds to Chinese and Japanese sentences differently. I’m emphasising ‘sentences’ because when I see individual words my mind defaults to the Japanese reading, since I know a lot more Japanese vocabulary and kanji than I know Mandarin vocabulary and hanzi. But when seeing sentences I can read in Chinese, my mind automatically dictates it in Chinese, unless there’s a pair of hanzi I know the meaning of as kanji but not in Chinese.
It also helps that when reading in Japanese kanji is always surrounded by kana.

I wrote about what I'm currently doing for Mandarin in my study log recently, so I'll just quote it here:

So, not much at all, but works for me at the moment. Just a little bit of exposure each day is what I’m going for. I deliberately chose this method because for Mandarin my strength is my listening ability, so I’m using that to gradually learn more vocabulary and recognise words by their hanzi. Of course that’s not going to work for people in a different situation from myself.

Sorry, got a bit long there :laughing: but basically, learning hanzi as vocabulary in context will help you tremendously in keeping the two languages separate. Or if you find hanzi is too difficult to learn that way, reviewing them in context (aka reading) will aid you in the same way, probably.

Doesn’t hurt to try, so go and mess around with Cantonese! Good luck!

7 Likes

Japanese 2: The Rejapanesing

9 Likes

I was considering Mandarin, but ermmm… Can’t hear the tones. Nor can I immitate them (probably because I literally cannot hear the difference in the first place). I tried learning before, and while my ability to learn the characters and grammar is on point, my listening and speaking are absolutely awful. I have a native chinese friend, who tried to practice with me - but for the life of me I can’t get it right. The different tones just whoosh over my head. I know many people who can’t hear certain sounds in foreign languages, such as differentiating between ‘h’ and ‘ch’ in Slovak. But I am yet to hear of someone who’s somehow overcome this difficulty. So ye, until I find a solution to my hearing issue, I’ll have to put my Mandarin studies on hold. Or perhaps I will just go with reading/writing and pretend conversations don’t exist.

Aside from Mandarin, I’d like to have another go at Swedish and Icelandic. Germanic languages are absolutely stunning, and I can actually audibly grasp them so that should make the process of learning a lil easier.

2 Likes

I just feel like if you put the same amount of afford and study hours. You could make much more meaningful progress in other langauges lol.

Thai is a silly and overcomplicated langauge. A lot of thai cannot effectively read and write until they are in middle school, to add insult to injury, Thai casual life conversations are … how to put it chaotic and have many stupid slangs. When I was in university, I made friend with a lot of international exchange students. They’re literate in Thai but they almost never understand the casual conversations between Thai people.

However, if you are really passionate about it yeah why not. Give it a go you might endup liking it.

3 Likes

same…
my partner started spanish same time i started japanese. i work tons more than he does. i still understand more spanish than japanese lol!

don’t think i could do another language like japanese but i’d like to have at least a look at korean.

4 Likes

Mandarin or Cantonese if I ever reach a point that I feel that Japanese doesn’t use enough kanji :joy:.

6 Likes

Fixed that for ya :stuck_out_tongue:

3 Likes

I think I’d get back into French possibly and then pick up German and Spanish. I’m text conversational in French, but I have trouble speaking it now lol. It tends to turn into Japanese. I studied all three formally in high school/college, so it’d just be a matter of reviewing the basics then expanding my vocab I think.

I’d want to get native media practice in each, but I’m not sure any of them grab my attention like Japanese media. Maybe I could try watching their dubs of JoJo lmao

6 Likes

I would learn French and improve my English. I’m a Brazililan, it would be convenient to learn Spanish, but I don’t feel like learning it.

2 Likes