J-Test (日本語実用検定 - にほんごじつようけんてい)


#1

There was a topic about it that I posted in back when I took it in January, but that’s been archived. Just as an aside, this seems to be the most appropriate existing category for this, but shouldn’t there be a “testing” category?

For those that are unfamiliar, here’s the website (only available in Japanese) http://j-test.jp/
One interesting thing about it is that it includes about 30 questions where there are no choices provided. You must write the answer on the answer sheet.

Another interesting thing is that it’s offered a lot more than JLPT, 6 times a year, but only in Japan and some east Asian countries.

In January I scored 517 points to get the D level certificate. I took it again in March, and just got my results.

This time I scored 608 points on the 1000 point scale, so I’ll get a C level certificate that is equivalent to N2 on JLPT.

There are two versions of the standard J-Test, and also a business version, but I’ll leave that aside for now.
There’s a beginner’s version, that has levels G, F, and E.

G = lower than N5
F = N5 = A1 on the CEFR scale
E = N4 = A2

The second version of the test is for intermediate and up.

D = N3 = B1
C = N2 = B2
B = N1 = C1
A = Better than N1 = C2


JLPT Drawbacks
#2

How long did it take you to get through the whole test?


#3

For the A-D test, the vocab/grammar/reading/writing section is 80 minutes. Listening is 50 minutes. I believe.


#4

Whoa, N2, that’s some good level, congrats! How long have you been learning Japanese, Leebo?

Also, err, 600/1000 = N2 when it’s already quite a strong knowledge of the language? So, you need 800 or so for the N1 equivalent? Is there a ranking higher than N1?


#5

I’ve been studying since the end of 2013. So just over 3 years. N1 is equivalent to 700, so as you can see, the hardest parts of it are much harder than N1. A level, or C2 on the CEFR scale, is the highest certificate at 900 points. Well, there’s “special A” at 930 points, but that doesn’t equate to any other standard.

Honestly N1 is not that amazing of a level in language learning. It’s daunting because of the kanji, but it’s nowhere near mastery of the language.


#6

So about two hours… Blech…
Even the J-CAT felt like forever to me.
They are around the same length right?


#7

I’m pretty sure J-Cat is shorter, but I didn’t check.


#8

The JLPT doesn’t test your active skills too, but I’m taking the JLPT because it makes my salary higher. Passing N1 doesn’t make me feel more confident in my Japanese. (If I’m lucky and get N1 this July.)


#9

J-Cat only takes around half an hour.


#10

I felt mine was so much longer than 30 minutes. Welp.


#11

Yeah, it’s true that J-Test tests your active skills a little bit, but I think it’s still insufficient as far being a true test of writing. You aren’t asked to express opinions, summarize content, or make logical arguments. You’re just asked to answer what are essentially just grammar and kanji reading questions without the benefit of multiple choice options.


#12

I’ve got my third attempt coming up on Sunday.

The first time I took it I got 517 points.
The second time, 608 points.
Can I get 700?!
Probably not, heh.


#13

Sitting in the room, waiting for the test to start…

Should be done in a few hours.


#14

(I was about to write good luck but then saw that you posted this 9 hours ago…)

I hope it went well!


#15

Yeah, it went okay. I’ll post some pics of the test booklet later. I spent the rest of the day in Osaka, since that’s where the test was.


#16

Here’s the kanji writing section from the test.


#17

At the risk of sounding like a dummy… How are you supposed to answer these? Do you write the hiragana?

Thanks for sharing this by the way! Glad to hear it went okay.


#18

Yeah, you write the hiragana on the answer sheet. I’ll post some more later also. The written answer questions are always interesting.


#19

I was able to scan this one, so you can see the whole instructions and everything. This is what the main writing section looks like.


#20

Woo! I checked the published answers against the notes I took in the question booklet and I am about 99% certain I scored over 700 points! I count it as 725, but there’s always that chance I didn’t actually mark down what I thought I did.

Still my goal to just improve was shattered and I think I earned B Level, which is the same as N1.

WaniKani is certainly to thank for a large chunk of my improvement. I scored 87% on the kanji section. And it makes reading a smoother experience.