Fonts are throwing me off!

To tweak what Nath wrote, it is the katakana version of vowel lengthening - instead of adding あ、い、or う, you just add the (horizontal or vertical) hyphen.

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I totally imagined you going from a serious tone to a sugeeeeee in just 1 second. Loved it.

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And then baachan will tut tut and correct you with “suGOI”. :older_woman:t3:

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Yes! That! I am really tired at the moment, and I don’t word too good.

And that’s exactly what would have happened if I was talking out loud. Was I? You’ll never know.

Without even looking up from what she is doing.

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As long as it is a baachan from Grandmas recipes, I’m okay with it :stuck_out_tongue:

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My favorite part is when 女 straight up becomes め haha whyyyyy

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Well, 女 is the kanji that め comes from, so… :stuck_out_tongue:

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#twinning #whereallmysparetimegoes #ireallyshouldbestudyingrightnow

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re this image ^

The thing that will really help (dunno if I am repeating someone) comprehend writing/font for both kana and kanji is knowing stroke order - the way your pen moves to draw the character. This is why that third image is perfectly legible.

That first stroke can be drawn as a heavy to light stroke (like the one on the top of the ‘so’ transition character in the table below). Also apparently the kanji it is derived from actually uses a two stroke radical:

Also re the Onna->me note and potential usefulness understanding the stroke order of the rest of the kana:
https://www.nihongoresources.com/language/writing/kana.html

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The second そ in that picture is actually how I write them! I saw it a couple of times in other people’s handwriting (wondering “what the hell is that”) and found out that it takes less effort that way, at least for me.

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I just got to this at level 13 with 女神. I already knew the pronunciation before I saw the kanji (because anime) and when I saw 女 I did a quadruple-take, like, wait, what, was that-, is it-, but-…

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You’ll see that character written horizontally in WK, decently soon.

Yes, it does look like the kanji for one.

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SAME! Seeing 女 turn into め makes that make SO much more sense!

I tend to write my そs the same way I write my crotchet rests. It’s… probably not how they’re supposed to appear. :stuck_out_tongue:

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For anyone else wondering what a “crochet rest” is, it’s this squigglyboi:

It is used for writing music.

I just started playing through Okami HD on PC because you can play it in Japanses… and I stared at this for a good 5 minutes because I understood what I was seeing…

Capture

I knew from context that it was talking about a white wolf (and I’ve played through this game in English before) but I couldn’t figure out what the squiggle between the カ and the が was to save my life even though I knew it was supposed to be a ミ. I don’t have much experience yet with reading in different fonts, but after much head scratching I realized it was, in deed, a ミ. I feel kind of stupid now, but at least I eventually recognized it… :expressionless:

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What you’re talking about isn’t actually font, but style– Japanese writing can come in three styles: Kaisho (Script), Gyosho(Semi-Cursive), and Sosho(Cursive). Both are designed to traditionally be written with a brush, with Kaisho emphasizing each character resting inside an equivalent “block” of space, and Gyosho noticeably trying to make the brush leave page as few times as possible until the character is finished. Sosho, in a way that’s noticeably different from English, makes each character literally one stroke, and is more or less unreadable even to most Japanese people, existing solely as a form classical calligraphy (kind of like wildstyle graffiti, except japanese and like 800 years old).

Here’s a link to show the difference:
http://www.sljfaq.org/afaq/shotai-handwritten.html#shotai-handwritten-kaisho

While Kaisho is the most common and the one used in official lettering (likely because the blocks of space lend themselves well to letterpress printing and word processors) Gyosho often shows up to give stuff a handwritten or expressive feel, especially on signage for restaurants. They do have slightly different stroke orders, as Gyosho typically simplifies Kaisho characters into ones with fewer, longer strokes, but once you see them more you can get a sense for which is which.

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“Two syllabic alphabets and different typefaces? How will I ever read Japanese? What an impossible language!” typed the native English-speaker in a font containing a mix of lowercase and capital letters, as well as individual characters that don’t resemble their handwritten versions at all, before going on to leave a note written in mixed printing and script.

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Comic Sans MS is one of the only standard English computer fonts that includes the handwritten “a.” :upside_down_face:

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Is Century Gothic not a standard English computer font?