Exporting all content & my progress?


#1

Hello everyone.

I was wondering how can I export all WK items (radikals/kanji/vocab) and my progress for each of them?
Something like csv file I can then use. I would like to calculate different statistics such as how much of each type of items I review every day, what type of items are more difficult and my provisional progress, etc. Basically want to get all scientific about my learning :slight_smile:


#2

the API provides a lot of info: https://www.wanikani.com/api

i personally don’t know how to use it as i’ve never needed to, but it probably isn’t too difficult to figure out.


#3

require ‘wanikani’
#
#
print Time.now
#
Wanikani.api_key = “16bxxxxxxxxxxxxxx4490e”
#
Wanikani.api_version = “v1.3”
#
myDist = Wanikani::SRS.distribution
myQue  = Wanikani::StudyQueue.queue
#
open(‘myfile.txt’, ‘a’) { |f|
   #
   f << " { “time”=>{ "
   f << Time.now
   f << " }, "
   #
   f << myDist
   #
   f << ", "
   f << myQue
   #
   f << “\n”
}
#


a little ruby to get you started. :-0

Output: 

{ “time”=>{ 2015-05-27 02:05:41 -0700 }, {“apprentice”=>{“radicals”=>15, “kanji”=>40, “vocabulary”=>172, “total”=>227}, “guru”=>{“radicals”=>8, “kanji”=>49, “vocabulary”=>235, “total”=>292}, “master”=>{“radicals”=>14, “kanji”=>44, “vocabulary”=>147, “total”=>205}, “enlighten”=>{“radicals”=>53, “kanji”=>103, “vocabulary”=>271, “total”=>427}, “burned”=>{“radicals”=>169, “kanji”=>198, “vocabulary”=>379, “total”=>746}}, {“lessons_available”=>15, “reviews_available”=>71, “next_review_date”=>1432717541, “reviews_available_next_hour”=>6, “reviews_available_next_day”=>81}

Which is pretty close to JSON – %s/=>/:/g  or some such regex, then ingest into, say, mongoDB (it likes JSON) and then use the mongoDB I/F to R and you can go statistical crazy. If you can get Shiny and ggplot to work for you, you should be able to get a job. :-)  Or you could use R to drop a csv … JK
 

Anyway:

https://github.com/dennmart/wanikani-gem

It is fun to play with, but, ah, aa, 私は日本語を べんきょうしましょう。



#4

Thanks, Jtg9, for the shout-out of my little library!

Although this might not be exactly what you want / need, but you can probably get some value out of my Wanikani to Anki exporter. While the purpose of that site is to create files that can be imported into Anki, the generated files are really just plain text files and the values are comma-separated. That means you should be able to import it into your spreadsheet software of choice. I just tested it out on LibreOffice Calc (open-source version of Microsoft Excel) and it was able to set the spreadsheet properly. You’ll still have to clean up some extra rows / columns that are used for Anki’s purposes, and it doesn’t really give fine-grained control over some of the items, but it’s a start and it’s something (for free!).

Outside of that, if you’re a developer, the API is the easiest way to get this info (which is why I built all these different tools throughout the years). Good luck!


#5

Anzeigan,

Check out my web app wanikaniexplorer:

http://wanikaniexplorer.com

You can export all your data to csv files there: radicals, kanji, and vocab.  Essentially this csv contains all the info that the wani kani API currently provides.

Some higher level users have reported issues with the data download – it’s due to some unexpected unicode characters that I’m trying to debug.  However, since you’re level 8, I think you’ll be fine.  Let me know if you have a problem.  I’ve noted that Excel does not display the unicode kanji characters correctly, but other programs (like Numbers on the Mac) don’t have any issues.

By the way, I intent wanikaniexplorer to be “all scientific” with user data.  Let me know if there’s a stat or metric there that I don’t have and I’ll try to add it.

Cheers!


#6
ZenBrayn said... Anzeigan,

Check out my web app wanikaniexplorer:

http://wanikaniexplorer.com

You can export all your data to csv files there: radicals, kanji, and vocab.  Essentially this csv contains all the info that the wani kani API currently provides.

Some higher level users have reported issues with the data download -- it's due to some unexpected unicode characters that I'm trying to debug.  However, since you're level 8, I think you'll be fine.  Let me know if you have a problem.  I've noted that Excel does not display the unicode kanji characters correctly, but other programs (like Numbers on the Mac) don't have any issues.

 Thank you ZenBrayn - I like it!  I really just want a list of the vocabulary that I can print off and look at when I want to - I'd like to be able to download to excel or open office but as you noted the characters don't display correctly :(.  I wonder if I buy the Japanese language pack for windows if they would display correctly then?  But then again, it's probably not worth the $25 - gotta buy my kids some haircuts. 

Downloading from your app at least gives me the list of words in English, and I could hunt down every kanji and copy/paste into the list in excel, but I don't see myself doing that.

Anyway, have a great day!


#7

This helped me and maybe it will help someone else.  In looking through the forums I was not finding the information about how you type in hiragana, but when I was looking at the Additional Japanese Resources List by Aikibujin:

/t/Additional-Japanese-Resources-List/9830/1

I used one of the memrise links:  http://www.memrise.com/course/258569/beginners-japanese-grammar-1-jlpt-n5-grammar/

and followed their instructions for “Using a Japanese Keyboard” to switch to Japanese input mode for my microsoft office programs.  Sweet!  That is what I wanted.  I am sure there are instructions in the forums here somewhere, but I didn’t come across them in the week I have been here.

The reason I am posting this here is that, in conjunction with the vocab list I exported using ZenBryan’s app (see above), I was able to open the list in Excel, delete all but the vocab words in English, and then type in the hiragana (and convert them to the right kanji).  That alerted me right away which kanji I am still weak on.  Still a little worried about using the right on’yomi or kun’yomi, but I like this as a study tool.