Your worst typos WaniKani has accepted

It’s a Catholic mass which involves praying that the souls of those in Purgatory are able to find rest. It’s sometimes also called “Requiem”, which might ring some bells. Not sure why we’re learning the kanji for it, though - maybe there’s a similar Buddhist concept?

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Thanks. This was my assumption. Although there haven’t been a lot of direct Buddhist terms in WaniKani – 仏, 浄土, and the words for monks and priests are the only ones that come to mind immediately – I have found that having a basic knowledge of Buddhism helps understand a lot of media references, and I figured this is one.

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Nice

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On that note, this totally legitimate response is one to look forward to.

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image

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Suddenly, rice!

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is startled

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I know WK didn’t accept this but… So how would you pronounce this? ゔ?

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It’s usually used for “v” in loanwords, so it’s a little unusual to see it in hiragana form. For instance, one way to write “vampire” is ヴァンパイア.

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Aye, and that’s going to be how you typed it as well - “navareru” instead of “nagareru”.

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What even is that word lol (White crhysantreum)

My english classes never prepared me for this “shite”

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It’s a flower. The Imperial symbol of Japan.

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I always mess up 体験 and 実験 because of it.

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I meant to say the the english translation doesn’t help at all in this case because there is a 0% chance you will know that name in english beforehand.

A 0% chance someone will know “chrysanthemum”? I personally am no flower expert, but as noted, in this case it’s a symbol of Japan. For instance, the emperor’s position is sometimes called the Chrysanthemum Throne in the media, etc. Of course, it’s an actual throne as well, but the name gets extended to the whole role sometimes.

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I’ll hit the other side from Leebo’s argument, I’m no flower expert either but I definitely knew what a chrysanthemum was before I got it in WaniKani, and I had no idea it related to the imperial anything. To say that native speakers have a 0% chance is pretty bold. There are definitely words I’ve had to check before, though, this just wasn’t one of them.

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I often see chrysanthemum in the flower sections of grocery stores

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Yeah, I knew the actual flower in this case, as well, but I figure that could be fairly regionally restrictive, so there are probably a decent number of native English speakers around the world who don’t live somewhere that sells chrysanthemums at their local store.

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I don’t even know what happened there :sweat_smile:

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Supposedly the white chrysanthemum is also an emblem of Mother’s Day here in Australia, which I vaguely recall reading about sometime, but which I’ve certainly never observed myself…

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