Your vocabulary routine


#1

What kind of routine you follow for vocabulary next to wanikani.
I had a idea for myself to put the voc and kanji from each level inside a system like anki so I can repeat it more.


#2

Quite a few people do what you’re suggesting.


#3

I like to keep a handwritten diary sometimes. It helps me remember the kanji for the words and hand-writing them also helps me distinguish similar kanji. Even if I can’t write anything about myself using new words, sometimes I’ll just write random sentences as practice.


#4

I’m using an Anki 10K deck, and also doing a lot of reading, so I already get enough overlap.

You might want to consider KaniWani. I don’t use it, but if you’re on level 8 and wanting to solidify your understanding of the WaniKani vocabulary, it may be up your alley.


#5

Memrise - one course for N3 vocab, another for integrated approach vocab and i have some grammar ones on there from N4 which i keep up with. I also have another phone app with all the N5-3 enabled to keep recapping. I have also made an intransitive and transitive course for memrise but i need to edit it.

Separate to that, I read on Satori reader, Matcha and occasionally NHK news (but Matcha is my favourite when used with a furigana off toggle extension thing).

I have been contemplating the 10k though - does anyone know how it differs from the JLPT vocab? more useful or will i pretty much cover all the vocab in it if i keep with the JLPT courses?


#6

I enter unknown vocab into Anki, though I never enter words with unknown kanji. I only enter kana-only words, or words that are not covered by WK but that I already learned the kanji for.

Most importantly, I don’t usually enter the vocab only, but always a real sentence I saw in NHK Easy, Satori Reader, WK example sentences and the like. That makes it easier to memorise (since you get the context cues) and shows me how the word is actually used, instead of just the basic meaning. Sometimes I will enter two or three sentences for a single word, if it’s too nuanced or has no single English/Portuguese equivalent.

I also enter sentences with previously unknown grammar points, idioms, or basically anything that makes me go “ah!, so that’s how you say that!”.