Writing Kanji Methods

Considering I am approaching Level 60, I believe it is time to take writing Kanji by hand a little more seriously. However, I am at a loss on how to do this. I have dabbled before, using the Kodansha Kanji book and Anki as an SRS system. I am just wondering if anyone has any tips, as I am finding it difficult to pinpoint a method that feels like it works.
What method do you follow for writing practice and does it feel like it is ‘sticking’?

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One thing that I do use to input kanji directly into kaniwani using a tablet input. I spent like $30 on mine, and I am able to draw the kanji into my IME, which then puts them into the answers field on kaniwani.
I believe that other people do the same thing with their phone.
Otherwise, I made paper flashcards with stroke order diagrams, and I use them to practice. There is even a “stroke order diagram” font that you can install on your system, and make your own practice sheets.
(congratulations on nearly reaching 60. You will be there before you know it!)

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Using tablet or phone IME has its advantages, for example, if you’re not 100% certain how a kanji is written, you can just wing it and it will offer you several alternatives to choose from.

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Check out Skritter - it’s a finger on tablet writing practice system. I had a blast on their week’s free trial. Was quite fun! Definately gonna head their after level 60. I think they got a WaniKani course too.

https://skritter.com

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that’s on my list to check out, too. once i’m 60 and the reviews have calmed down a little. don’t wanna do double work and burn out :slight_smile:

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I recommended this somewhere else before but the Kanji Study app (both android and ios) is a great tool imo. You can try it for free to see if it’s for you but to unlock the rest of the Kanji it’s $16 or so? I got mine during a sale so I don’t remember the initial price. Definitely worth it though.

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When I have time I use Kaniwani and write out my answers on paper before typing them in, looking up stroke order on Jisho.org if it seems like a tricky one.

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I didn’t know about the stroke order font- that looks really interesting.

I am not the biggest fan of the IME method but probably worth another go.

Thanks for the help everyone! :kissing_heart:

A good free option of an app for Android (Haven’t seen it on iPhone) is Kanji Tree. It works on a three-strikes-you’re-out system when writing your kanji and scores your accuracy based on how close you are to the line. I like it a lot for my Galaxy Note since I’ve got the stylus built in.

I might try Skritter myself though after clicking that link… that looks great!

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Write the kanji over and over again in a regular notebook or a kanji review notebook. If the strokes and the clear image of the kanji isn’t visible in your mind when you think of the kanji, write it another hundred times or so.

Ideally when you imagine a kanji that you have memorized, your mind should immediately move to the strokes and follow them as you imagine the word.

I don’t really think apps and stuff are necessary for something like this. All you need is a pen/pencil and paper, and lots of time.

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Srsly, Skritter.

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Kanji Tree or Kanji Study, both are great, full version is $6-$7 I think. The free versions of both the apps have everything you’ll need to practice. With the paid version you can add custom lists, so basically you can study them according to WK’s order.

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