Why are you learning japanese~

I wanna know why you guys are learning japanese.
Tryna see others motivations, reasons, and goals yk
SO TELL ME ( ✧Д✧)

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I want to know as many languages as possible. Each one is like a new DLC where you unlock millions of people to talk to. I chose Japanese to be my first because I wanted my first to be difficult and nearly entirely foreign, hence making the subsequent latin and germanic languages I dive into feel easier.

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So I can finally understand what they’re saying on hentai.

I’m kidding, of course. I mainly got into it through music and then by watching j-dramas. I keep at it because I love Japanese culture and media.

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There lots of existing threads with answers to this question. To save time to everyone:

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I accidentally stumbled into a study abroad program back in undergrad, despite having zero knowledge of Japan or Japanese, but I ended up spending 10 weeks in Tokyo at a language school to everyone’s surprise (and my own surprise). And even though my entire life up until the day I got to Tokyo I had no major interest in Japan other than a mild knowledge of anime, that 10-week study abroad course has driven everything I’ve done in my life since then! My jobs, further schooling, careers, travel, and now continuing to learn the language - everything has been influenced by that totally random study abroad semester that I did 8 or so years ago.

I was certainly jealous of everyone in my study abroad course who already knew some Japanese because their language skills just skyrocketed improvement over the 10 weeks. I know it’s especially difficult to make such major travel plans these days, but I still recommend even spending just a very short time in Japan if at all possible.

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I’ve never really traveled to a country where I didn’t know the language, and my little brother is very into anime and started talking about going to Japan. Then COVID happened and I had a lot of time on my hands, so I started trying it out on DuoLingo (where I’d been casually trying to add to my limited Spanish knowledge for a while). Somehow that lead to me finding WK which was just a really good way to keep my brain active during this time. The more I learned the more I felt like committing further to really see it pay off in some way.

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I became interested in learning it in middle or high school after being introduced to manga and anime by one of my friends, though I never got very far in learning it. What finally kicked my ass into gear was falling in love with a certain Winter 2021 anime and learning it was adapted from a LN series that absolutely is never getting an official English translation (though, not like I always like official translations anyway…), and I needed more content, so I bought the books and started trying to read the side stories with my meagre knowledge. A couple months later, I found WK and started using some other resources as well, and reading has only gotten easier since then, so now I’m completely hooked. (It’s actually a bit of a problem since I’d much rather spend my time reading, but I absolutely still have a ways to go with studying…)

I’d like to become a translator. There are tons of poor-quality translations out there, and I’d like to help contribute to the number of good ones. The stories and their fans deserve better than half-assed, nigh incomprehensible sometimes, and/or machine-translated translations.

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Wait, I’m learning Japanese? I was completely mislead

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I have always loved anime and manga/asian culture. I have been addicted to the grind of dumb mobile games for years and finally realized I get the same dopamine bursts form learning japanese. So 5 weeks later and about 100 hours in and I am obsessed. Hiragana/Katakana and 40 grammar points (bunpro) and almost 2 levels on Wanikani later.

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I like learning new languages, I consume a lot of Japanese media (anime, manga etc.) so it makes sense to learn it instead of just relying on translations.

My main goal and motivation is being able to fluently read light novels, complex goal but I hope to accomplish it one day!

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I like to learn languages and I’d like to read more about Japan’s history and its historical figures besides diving in their folklore, and of course read light novels, manga and play JRPG games without needing to rely on translations/localizations.

Not that complex, you can do it!

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My weeb ancestry compels me. :joy:

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At the beginning of the year I got really into watching sumo wrestling, and after seeing just how much stuff (documentaries, news articles, youtube videos, interviews, etc.) was available but only in Japanese, I got motivated to learn the language.
My goal is to become fluent in the language and sumo has been an amazing motivator!

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I live in a Buddhist temple in Japan so I definitely need to speak and understand Japanese. Reading and writing are not as important for me, but I’d like to be able to read books mainly. Hence the Kanji study with WaniKani.

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:handshake: except it’s pro wrestling for me, not sumo!

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At this point it’s probably just self harm.

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I am learning Japanese because I want to, not because I have to. I love Japan, Japanese culture, and grew up drawing anime amd watching it. I just have really really wanted to learn it and want to visit Japan so badly!

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Because I want to find a Japanese girlfriend.*

Um, I mean, because I think that many Japanese-manufactured products are cool - my camera equipment and my car and my radio/electronics devices and pens and mechanical pencils and stationery and so on and so forth were all made in Japan, and the quality of those items and the care and ingenuity that contributed to their development and manufacture is a reflection of Japanese cultural traits that I find intriguing.

Years ago I happened to be poking around under the hood of my car and noticed some writing that was clearly not English, and thought to myself, “why can’t I read that?”. Well, many years have passed since then, and now I truly understand at a deep level why I can’t read that - but, to borrow a phrase, “It’s getting better all the time”.

*I seem to recall from many years ago seeing a gag tee-shirt that apparently had a message in Japanese that meant, “Looking for a Japanese girlfriend” - I’ll have to see if I can find one of those (tee shirts, that is - but maybe a Japanese girlfriend as well).

Half a lifetime ago, in my mid-twenties, I got a job as a server at a very small Japanese restaurant. I was the only staff person who wasn’t Japanese, so it ended up being something of a mini-language-and-culture-immersion experience. My coworker taught me a handful of words and started me on hiragana. I didn’t really learn much more at that point but I was fascinated and it was enough to get me hooked.

It took many years before I decided to really pursue it, because 1) in the 90s/00s, self-study meant books + cds, or non-credit classes that required vastly more time, money and energy than I had to invest, 2) I had the impression that learning kanji was next to impossible, and 3) I was already well into adulthood and had zero intention of moving to Japan, I.e., it seemed completely impractical. If I was going to invest in learning a language it seemed I should learn something like Spanish or even French that I’d be more likely to actually use.

But about three years ago I stumbled on a kana-learning app and…a lightbulb went off. The app gamified kana learning for me, and made it fast, fun, practical—then I found wanikani and discovered kanji is not actually impossible to learn, and it’s fine to focus first on reading and listening comprehension and writing/stroke order later. I use Human Japanese and Tae Kim for grammar… and I don’t care anymore about how practical it is or not. I love learning Japanese. I’m hoping that the experience of getting Japanese under my belt will provide a kind of gateway for me into acquiring other languages, like Spanish— which, ironically, I’ve found harder to learn, I think because they’re more similar to English and less conceptual (less interesting to me).

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Actually one of the reasons i’m learning any language is because of the apps which make learning a language so much easier and fun and addictive than when i first started learning Japanese 30 years ago and sort of lost my way after finishing the first beginner’s textbook and thereafter struggling with how to continue to learn Japanese after that

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