Studying for JLPT N3

Hi everyone. I’m studying for JLPT N3 and planning to appear for the exam this December. I’m wondering if Wanikani could help me with the vocabulary and Kanji perspective. I’m curious about how the levels were decided.

What level would you usually recommend to achieve for a JLPT N3 aspirant?

ありがとうございました!

1 Like

You can go to WaniKani Stats and go to the “Charts” section, subsection “JLPT” to see how will be covered by a certain level. Note that the sections only refer to the kanji not on lower level of JLPT (ie: 人 won’t be considered an N3 kanji, since it is an N5 kanji).

Level 35 is where 95% of the N3 kanji are covered (along with 100% of the N5 and N4 kanji). At this point, 73% of the N2 kanji and 23% of the N1 kanji will also be covered. So, while you will be mostly good then, you have to note that you will be spending a lot of time learning hundreds of kanji outside the N3 exam.

1 Like

I think you can also select Cumulative percentages.

As for help on the test: it will definitely help on the kanji section, it might help on vocabulary, it won’t be enough for grammar, reading and listening.

Go for 60. Go all the way.

As the other comment mentions, for ~95% of N3 kanji you’d be looking at L35. At a brisk pace of say 8 days a level that would put you at Feburary 2021.

Or thinking of it another way, it’s ~190 days until the JLPT test date IIRC. That’d be enough to get +24 levels putting you at 28, which is still ~85% of N3 content.

3 Likes

I took N3 at lvl 30 and I didn’t have any kanji-related issues. I think you should be fine if you get to lvl ~25 by December. But you should practice reading in addition to doing WK, as reading a cohesive text is different from recalling separate kanji and words.

Regarding vocab, WK isn’t the best place to study it. It doesn’t feature many common words. And there’s a lot of words that are writting in kana, which are naturally not a part of WK

2 Likes

Whoa, thanks MegaZeroX. I didn’t know about such a website. Will check it out.