Simple hiragana question


#1

I have only been practicing hiragana for a couple of days, but when trying some reading practice i came across the following word: おじいさん. According to the website, this translated as ‘ojisan’ in romaji, where I figured this as ‘ojiisan’. Can anyone explain why a double ‘i’ would be written as a single ‘i’? Not that it really matters how it is written in romaji, but I am intrigued.

Peter


#2

I’ve seen double vowels being written as ā, ē, ī, ō, ū, but since you can’t really write them with a standard keyboard I guess most people just write the actual vowel instead.


#3

I wouldn’t think much of it, as long as you know it’s pronounced as おじいさん, as おじさん means uncle. I think it’s mainly just style. とうきょう normally isn’t written as Toukyou after all.


#4

There’s no single agreed upon way to romanize Japanese. This is one reason why most people recommend you learn the kana before anything else.

1510719043189


#5

Thanks all, I will just ignore it and continue practice :grinning:


#6

I need a source on this! :grinning:


#7

Cheese eye kimmono buckery

:joy:

Tomago para para, pon pon night

:rofl:


#8

:fearful::scream::fearful: This… no…


#9

My eyes!!!


#10

Just to be clear, this was a romaji question, rather than a hiragana question, right? What was the website you were referring to?

I was thinking maybe google translate or something, but it has ojīsan, rather than ojisan, in the romaji section, so maybe not.

And one more nitpicky thing, that’s not a translation, it’s just a different way to write the word.


#11

There is a difference between Ojiisan and Ojisan. and how it’s pronounced.

Ojiisan おじいさん - grandfather
Ojisan おじさん - uncle

How it’s shown as romaji is a different story. But I’ve seen it both ways depending on if they are talking about a grandfather or uncle or older person.

It’s also the similar with Grandmother and Aunt.

Here is the link that shows the difference between the two.
https://youtu.be/0Hs-bZgRhq8


#12

To dovetail on this. It’s called transliteration.


#13

It’s from a 19th century textbook. The excerpt I posted is here on page 28.

Some of my favorites:

to buy = Cow
to not understand = Walk arimasen
small = Cheese eye
hot water = Oh you


#14

It’s also about the Yokohama Pidgin which is entirely possible to not have been pronounced as standard Japanese, as it was a Pidgin.


#15

Walk—kallimassing!
Moods cashey!


#16

What is that, Germapanese? I’m so confused trying to understand it lol!


#17

I can’t tell you why, but that reminds me of this video


#18

That kind of thing makes me so glad that we have standardisation these days, even if we can’t decide whether to use Hepburn or Kunrei-shiki…


#19

A slow servant - Bakar
Sailor - Dam your eye sto
Where are the small ones you showed my friends from England last week? - Cheese eye doko
Unfortunately they were purchased on tuesday by a party of tourists from San Francisco - Arimasen
You’re very hard on a poor merchant but it’s yours for the sake of further business - Your a shee

He’s having a lot of fun with this