Should I read Imabi if I read Tae Kim?

So, I’ve read the entire Tae Kim’s grammar guide and I’m currently reviewing it with Anki, however I feel like I come to some peculiar grammar I don’t know on the occasion (or maybe is just vocabs I don’t know written in kana?).

I’ve glanced a vew “pages” of imabi and so far it seems it teaches the same stuff but with more formal language? What do you guys think?

I can’t imagine it’d hurt. I read both Tae Kim and Genki and I find it helps a ton when I see the same grammar points explained in different ways.

3 Likes

Reading the same grammar rules explained in different ways will only help you understand everything better by having a larger view on stuff (I guess).

4 Likes

I’ve read both Tae Kim and 150 or so of Imabi’s lessons and I find Imabi to be more clear and more thorough with more examples, but I’d say practicing grammar with SRS (like how you’ve been doing with anki) has been the most helpful to me.

Is there any made decks for grammar or do you create your own?

1 Like

I’ve been using Genki Decks from memrise, but in a month or two when I’m done with them I might make my own since the Tobira decks there don’t have grammar practice. I know someone who might make a shinkanzen N3 deck but Idk when he’ll get around to it.

Edit:https://www.memrise.com/course/75025/genki-ii-grammar-2/

I started using that one the other day!

Yes. Imabi goes far beyond the content Tae Kim offers. You don’t have to read the whole thing if you don’t want to (it covers a shit ton) but it’s a lot of fun.

1 Like

When learning new grammar, it’s a really good idea to read summaries and explanations from different sources. I usually look at 2-3 different sources for grammar I don’t understand. It really help solidify everything.

This topic was automatically closed 365 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.