Need help on schedule for this year's JLPT?

as wkstats I will pass 95% N5 at february 1st, N4 at march 14th, N3 at july 19th, N2 at october 9th

I have no idea which test I should take on July and December, as described I get fully N3 at near end of july, so I think I should take N4 on july?, and because I’ll finish N2 on wanikani on october 9th I think I will have enough time to revise for N2 to December

conclusion: N4 in July and N2 in December??? I need the path as fast as well, but I’m so worried because frankly N3 is an important milestone and that’s not smart to skip N3, and maybe I don’t have enough time (2 month) to revise for N3+N2 to get N2???

Any wise idea here?

Umm it probably depends on your knowledge in other areas like grammar, reading comprehension, and listening comprehension…

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Where do your other skills lie, such as grammar, vocab, reading, and listening? Those are going to be very important for the test, as well. To be honest, going from N4 to N2 in ~6 months sounds rather difficult to me because of how much more material is on the next level of each test.

I would assess where your skills currently are and then try to determine which test you’ll likely be able to study for by July. Then you can proceed based off that.

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JLPT is more than just vocab and kanji, it’s how good you are on other levels such as grammar, reading, and listening.
You cannot pass the JLPT with WaniKani alone.
For N4, you should finish Genki I and Genki II or some textbooks of the same level. For N3, I believe it’s Tobira.

I’ve heard that it usually takes about a year between both levels.

The JLPT website does have a ‘Can-Do’ evaluation for each level, so it might be best to consult that, but if you’re going just using WK, I doubt you’d be able to jump from N5 to N2 in the space of 11 months unless you are studying every day intensively.

But again, it depends on your current level.

Also, if you’re already to take the N2 at the end of the year, there’s not need to take the N4 in July. So, if you are already at the level, it’s best to just take the N2 because anything lower would be meaningless.

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It is not a sprint, it is a marathon. Remember about listening, reading and grammar. You wont pass with wk knowledge only. The gap between each following test level is huge. What is your background, what do you know atm about grammar, etc. How much time each day can you put into studying ?

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Yes I have near 15 hours / day to cover all aspect of JLPT, and I use many kind of material describe by urs, my friends
My only work is at home and learn japanese, immerse in japanese, so I hope I will be able to cover other field
It only take below 5 hours/day on wanikani, other time I use to improve all

Immersive is good! If you’re literally spending all waking hours doing it, it may be possible.

Here’s another guide for how many estimated hours of study it takes for each level

Level Hours of study
N2 1600~2800 hours
N3 950~1700 hours
N4 575~1000 hours
N5 325~600 hours

311 days until December, so 15 hours a day would mean 4665 hours of study.

I’d recommending taking a lot of practice exams to prepare yourself though and probably, if your goal is N2 in December, skipping the N4 and just work as hard as possible for N2.

(Disclaimer I should’ve mentioned in my first post; I’ve only taken the JLPT once, and I only passed the N4 by a few points. So my knowledge comes from doing a low level test once and reading a lot about the topic online, not first hand experience)

(Also did the maths, I’d have to spend 2-3 hours a day from now till December to apparently be the level of N3)

That being said you need to stay motivated the entire time doing this ! Keep it fun, try to mix what you do or you may reach a slump. If you really can keep this pace it is not impossible. Your limitations will come from mental and physical exhaustion. What you are trying to do is extremely hard in my opinion.

but take N4 is not lost much time, and it become an backup plan if I fail N2 in december ? ( I think so )

You don’t need to know 95% of the kanji for a given level to do fine on that level’s kanji section. There are usually only 6 or 7 questions anyway.

WK teaches the English glosses for words, which is fine for concrete things like cat or car, but it’s not enough to cover the language knowledge section of N2.

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If you skip the July JLPT, you can always take N4 or N3 instead of N2 in December when registration opens up. It’s not like you have to decide what you’re going to take in December now.
Study what you can for now and see how you feel by August/September/Whenever registration opens up.

It’s what I’m doing for the N3 - studying and seeing how I feel when registration opens up.

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I’m asking the best path, as you see, the time 4665 and 2800 is for sure. I wonder anyone on wanikani forum do like this before ? What have they done?

So as you mentioned, I can do this ? So I skip N4, and begin to use revise textbook on the beginning of N3?

It sounds like you’re trying to hit a leadoff grand slam, if you’ll excuse the baseball reference.

In other words, you should just study and decide what to take at the actual registration times. There’s no sense in worrying about what to register for in December before July registration even begins.

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Okay maybe I’m overthinking, thank you so much !

and I need to speak a few more , “I think so” here mean I think it’s good to have a backup, not mean “I think I will fail N2”, thanks you

You need to remember you’re expected to know the previous JLPT levels’ material when taking a level; N4 will require knowledge of both N5+N4, N2 will require N5+N4+N3+N2 etc. I’d start by working from N5 material and up, then see around both the summer and winter registration times where I was on the scale, and register to that.

Good luck!

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Just to add to the already stated, the I’d suggest to use the J-CAT test as an assessment of your level prior to test registration. Additionally to this, it’s a good idea to download the sample tests from the official JLPT website.

Of course, you can’t pass the JLPT on WaniKani alone, you should be working on all abilities of your Japanese.

As a final note, unless you REALLY need to pass the test for your school/job I really wouldn’t encourage you to study specifically towards the goal of passing JLPT levels since the test mainly evaluates your ability to understand the Japanese language, while you might be lacking on the ability of communicating effectively.

But anyways, best of lucks and welcome to this crazy journey

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