Most recent non-WK kanji you've learned?

I thought that one was new to me, but it turns out I’ve looked it up before, and now I can remember exactly where: this very silly looking diagram.

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I encountered (and entered) an actual 櫓 when I visited Hikone Castle back in 2017, though I don’t think I paid much attention to what kanji was being used. :stuck_out_tongue:

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Second book in the series 邂逅, no furigana of course. (I mean, it was again really easy to guess the reading…) I had to look up its meaning though :sweat_smile:
I feel like I have seen that word before though :thinking: And, considering its meaning (encounter), that’s probable.

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Ohh, I know that word! (Well, to be accurate I still mess up that review in Kitsun sometimes, but whatever!)

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I don’t get it. Phono-semantic, from what I see on google, means it’s from another language? But which one has ラ or めぐ.る as “go around” or “conceal”?

Simply put, it means that kanji with the same “sound” radical often have the same or similar on’yomi :slight_smile: As illustrated by this screenshot:

image

(borrowed from this thread: [Userscript] Keisei 形声 Semantic-Phonetic Composition)

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Phono-semantic composition in kanji means the kanji was created by taking the sound of one existing kanji (phono) and the meaning of some other part (semantic). This means it’s always an onyomi that contributed the sound part, not a kunyomi.

It’s like 80% of all kanji that have this kind of composition.

But when someone says something like this

They mean the sound relationship is still obviously apparent in modern Japanese, which is not always the case.

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I was also thinking about the radical (in the Japanese dictionary sense of the word) しんにょう, since it brings the concept of path/movement and the actual meaning of the kanji is めぐる.

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Ah, yeah, sure. The semantic relationships tend to survive better I think. Sometimes things do change a lot though.

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What an evil kanji, goddamn. I won’t say its meaning, but let’s just say there isn’t a single positive concept expressed by this kanji or any jukugo involving this kanji.

Well, I learned the kanji a few days ago, and it’s not great either :sweat_smile:

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漿

Just came across 脳漿 and 漿 doesnt look familiar.

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What a weird looking kanji.

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I learned 醬 from a book pretty recently :slight_smile:

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It really kinda is, isn’t it.

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Did it involve some 油 as well? :upside_down_face:

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Nope, in this case it was actually a character just describing stuff as “なんとか(ジャン)” (though they did show up together later in the same book)

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And then there’s 嫐.

It’s almost like this language was written by men. I’m nearly surprised there isn’t a kanji with three 男 that means “great courage and virtue” or somesuch.

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蚕 from 蚕食(さんしょく) meaning “encroachment”. Surprised to see a kanji I don’t think I have ever seen, in a kanken 5 practice deck.

Now that I think about it, I must have seen it somewhere when visiting a Japanese silk factory… :thinking: No recollection at all, though.

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Whoa, I read this post and then stumbled upon the word 邂逅 again just 5 minutes later or so on reddit

words I mined like 絨毯、邂逅、蹂躙、and 顰蹙! (Yes, I know these are quite common words

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