Kitsun or Iknow?

I’m personally a big fan of iKnow. It replicates the SRS function of Wanikani/oragnizes your study for you, but is more robust than Wanikani (and most other vocab apps?) in what it quizzes you on.

Its sole disadvantage, IMO, is that I don’t think it’s truly accessible for people starting from scratch. If you’re lower-intermediate and looking to pick up more vocabulary as a routine, though, I’d really recommend it.

It is another subscription (or lifetime purchase) on top of WK, but if you personally enjoy the way WK is structured, I think it’s a fairly worthwhile combination.

Edit – Oh, apparently they may have nixed the lifetime option. I’d still look into it though.

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Looks like you can get a lifetime of Kitsun for about 14 months of iKnow. What is iKnow, a library of pre-made decks build into scheduled courses?

I’ve only made my own decks within Kitsun though the pre-made decks appear to be high quality and well made. For making decks, it’s the easiest I’ve seen. The default layout designs are very simple to use and the Jisho card generator makes it very convenient to add new words and ton of synonyms. If you are creative deck builder, there are plenty of custom layout options to play with. I haven’t used the sub2kitsun but it appears more convenient to use compared to anything else on the market. The productive input (via WK styles and/or KameSame style) personal vocab lists is really what got my attention as a superior learning method compared to some non-input opinion polls (though I’ve used non-input for some special decks if I just want a classic flashcard format). And if you really want to use Anki content, you can upload it into Kitsun as well though I had some trouble on a geography deck so some formats may not translate. The browser on mobile has worked just fine for me as well. Neicul is a wizard too and is proactively improving the platform by the minute.

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Essentially, but with built-in testing for kanji-reading, sentence-completion (typed input), English-to-Japanese matching, Japanese-to-English matching, and listening. All vocabulary is also introduced with at least one recording of a context sentence, which I think is a big help. (The kanji-reading and sentence completion, though a benefit for learners with some experience, are also why I said it may not be suited for complete beginners. Being able to identify kanji components and knowing at least basic grammar patterns will help those aspects of review feel both smoother and more beneficial.)

That’s all just in its core review function. It also offers quick matching features to cut down on built-up queues and sentence-arrangement quizzing.

I haven’t used Kitsun to compare it to; just clarifying what it offers.

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I’ve been using iknow and I’ve just started using kitsun.
I think Iknow is great and I’m going to keep it even if I’m not lifetime. I had tried this year ago and it was too advanced for my level at the time but it’s great for an intermediate learners.
Words I’m learning with it are sticking, maybe it’s the variety of questions…from whole sentences to quick test on listening and writing.
I’ve started kitsun because everyone here was saying how it was easy compared to Anki but actually I’m not finding it so easy to use if you want to do your own deck with simple cards…
I find Anki to be quicker (that’s only my feeling maybe). I imported my deck form Anki (which was a simple exposure deck) but I can’t find a way to change effectively it’s layout :cold_sweat:.
I’m using it also with the 10k deck trying to suspend all the wanikani items but I can’t find an easy way to do that.
The whole deck is great though.

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Kitsun is probably more versatile, especially if you want to create you own deck. Sharing the deck, collaboration, card feedback is also a strong point (though I hope the community keeps on growing). If you are just in for the decks there is no reason not just to use Anki.

For mobile support it really depends on the layout of the deck, I’m thinking of creating a deck for Kitsun where you are shown similar kanji and you just tap them (because I hate typing on mobile).

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Tap them for what purpose? Select the ones with the same reading or something like that?

I’m still considering what to ask, something that has a single answer, and a small grid of kanji to choose from. Maybe English gloss -> kanji, or kun+on.

But Neicudi probably has to implement some additions for me again, it would be too easy when the answers always appear at the same position in the grid.

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Wow, thanks for all your replies!

Both of them look great, it’s hard to decide.
Maybe Iknow is better at teaching the 6k core than Kitsun? Or if it depends on the person and I can’t assume this?

It really depends on what you want. iKnow offers more review options for the Core deck, but you’re quizzed on them randomly and some may be detrimental. For example, you’ll sometimes get multiple choice questions (which I think is bad) with iKnow, but never in Kitsun (just talking about the Core 10k deck here). On the positive side, iKnow will sometimes quiz you on the example sentences themselves, whereas Kitsun doesn’t. (It could if the deck creator added that, but you can’t right now as far as I know.)

Another difference is that Kitsun is more predictable. It has defined stages like WaniKani. iKnow on the other had has more of a scatter approach (this is offered optionally in Kitsun as well) and does some kind is +/– offset for the SRS to add randomization. Which one is better depends on how you like to learn.

Overall I wouldn’t say one is better or worse than the other for the Core 6k/10k content. They’re just different.

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One more thing I forgot to mention. iKnow quizzes you on only one aspect each time (meaning, reading, listening, etc.), whereas Kitsun quizzes you on all of them every time (you can exclude quiz styles you don’t like if you want). This was the thing that I liked least about iKnow, personally. I think it was intended for simplicity, but sometimes I felt like I was advancing the items in the SRS just by getting the easy (e.g. multiple choice) questions right.

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It look like that kitsun fit more with my learning style. I think i’ll go for it.
Thanks!

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i don’t think multiple choice is bad. it emulates your experience with kanji conversion while typing. it diversifies the testing, which is useful, because you can never guess what iknow will want from you next, making you think on your feet (which i believe is the reason it’s so effective).

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That’s interesting. There are sentence recognition and comprehension cards included in the 10k on Kitsun.io. Are you referring to something else for quizzing the sentences? I’m not familiar with how iKnow does it.

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It’s been a while so I don’t remember. Maybe they’re basically the same at this point.

Just wanna clarify that it does quiz you on the sentences :stuck_out_tongue:

Core 10k on Kitsun quizzes you on:

  • Japanese word -> Meaning
  • Japanese word -> Reading
  • English -> Japanese
  • Japanese sentence audio -> Recognition (flipping card to answer with “understood” or “not understood”)
  • Japanese sentence -> Recognition (flipping card to answer with “understood” or “not understood”)

One does not need to do all modes as well. You can select which ones you want to do in the deck settings.

Not to mention that I’ve probably sent over 5000 suggestions on Kitsun’s Core 10k already (adding PoS, adding more meanings/better synonyms, etc) :eyes:

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How to do this

Steps:

  • You go to the deck.
  • Manage cards - a table with the deck cards will load.
  • You click on the square surrounded in red in the screenshot under to open advanced search.
  • Then, you type “wk” and click enter in the “Tags” box.
  • Finally, you click “Advanced Search”.

  • Clicking on that first square will select all cards.

  • And then you click hibernate and boom, they’re hibernated! :grin:

If you’re also using the sentence cards, then you’ll need to also load the those cards (those first cards that loaded were only vocab cards).

*And you repeat the previous steps for that again :DD

Hope it was clear :v:

Kitsun has Jisho integrated, so you can go to https://kitsun.io/dictionary, search for the term you want and click on “Generate Flashcard”.

The Default Flashcard will make you a flashcard with word -> meaning and word -> reading (just like Wanikani). Custom Flashcard is more when you want to add more ways of being reviewed besides those (for example, EN -> JP) or when you wanna use the layouts (the looks of a deck) that are not the Kitsun official ones.

You can also just search https://kitsun.io/dictionary/insert search term here that it will directly search for it.

Where are you struggling with?

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Thanks! I got the 10K right now :slight_smile:
As for my deck, I can’t seem to change it’s basilar layout…I go to decks, manage, I select all the card and then select layout but they don’t chance :confused:image
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My deck from Anki is the most basic and if I review it in kitsun the words are really small…I want to change the layout to make them bigger but I don’t know how to change the layout of the whole deck.

What should I do after I selected all the cards?

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Niceee :grin:


I think I know the problem. With the way you’re doing, you can only change the layouts under the same template.

I’d suggest trying to import the deck through a csv/tsv/txt (word list)…

Because after you’ll see this…

I hope that helps. Let me know if you can’t solve it through this method :slight_smile:

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done thanks :blush:
Now layout is fine but is it normal to have so many cards related to the same word when I create cards directly from the dictionary? :thinking:

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Nice, glad you found your way :grin:

hmm… no? :thinking: It should only create one. Would you mind explaining the steps you’re doing? Maybe post it on Kitsun’s thread so that Neicul can help you :slight_smile: It might be a bug.

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