Kanji/Hanzi Stroke Order

There are various characters in which the stroke order differs between Chinese and Japanese – examples include and . If I were to handwrite something in Japanese with Chinese stroke order and someone happened to be watching, would they notice the different stroke order? Is it considered bad practice in Japan to write like that?

It probably makes it harder for you to read some bad handwriting if you assume a different order of strokes. I tried to find a nice picture that exemplifies this but couldn’t atm.

Regarding japanese people judging you. It depends. Most will be impressed if you can write anything at all. But if they are into teaching at all they will at some point surely try to correct your stroke order for japanese ^^. It has real benefits like I tried to explain in the first paragraph.

Stroke order sometimes saved me big time, when I was in some smaller restaurants trying to decipher from the handwritten menu what I will eat.

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Apparently this is how I learn I’ve been writing the 必 kanji/radical the Chinese way this whole time :laughing:

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I’ve been learning Chinese way longer than Japanese, and it absolutely flabbergasted me to learn that the Japanese stroke order is like that lol. (I mean, isn’t 必 just 心 with an extra line? Why would they change it up like that??)

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I remember initially having that thought process about 田. Why wouldn’t the stroke order just be like 冂 + 土? I’m over that one now, but yeah, 必’s order in Japanese feels way stranger.

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yeah I went through shock>horror>confusion and now I’m solidly in denial about this.

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