Is there any way to skip levels?

So I studied Japanese for a year at college and have already memorized quite a few Kanji and Vocabulary. Is there a way I can take a test to see where Iam at and skip ahead to that point like there is with Duolingo?

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There is none, the wanikani system relies heavily on knowing the previous levels the way they teach them to match the mnemonics and such.
It’s best to just enjoy the ride while it’s easy.

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I can give you my perspective: I spent about three years in college studying Japanese and then did a study abroad one year, so I had a lot of knowledge coming into WK. The first 10-15 levels were almost entirely review for me, and after that your average level would be 50-60% kanji and vocab I already knew. Now that I’m pushing level 50 I find that the majority of words and kanji are new for me and my reading ability has improved dramatically.

It was a bit annoying spending the first couple of months mostly reviewing stuff I already knew but it was worth pushing through to reach the parts where I started learning new things. If you’ve only been studying a year, it probably won’t take you that long to reach the level where you’re learning a lot of new kanji and vocab.

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if you know the kanji and vocab already, you get them right on every review and then you level up very fast in the end.

I wouldn’t worry about skipping.

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Yeah. The only thing he has to memorize is the radicals. If he already knows most of the beginning kanji it should be a breeze.

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Not at all. I was in the same boat and I was irritated for the first 10+ levels. But now all of that previous knowledge from classroom learning is finally weaning away, and unfamiliar things are coming in. It’s worth the wait. 60 levels is a LOT and it’s good to just relax while it’s still easy, and get a hang of how WK even works and play around with scripts you’d might need.

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As a perspective, take it as you want to…

I studied Japanese on my own with little or no focus on kanji for 15 years, and then I got on board with WaniKani to make the trip into kanjiland. I made lv 60 and I’ve never regretted it! I would never have made the trip without WaniKani (my personal belief) :durtle_durverted_lvl2:

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I also took a year of Japanese at university before I started WK. It is well worth it to go though all the levels

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No, but 1 year of school study is very short in WaniKani levels, so you’ll be past that very quickly. Besides it’s good reinforcement and the essentials to keep learning with WK are necessary and are built up from level 1.

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you dont need to memorize radicals, I dont do it.

Since radicals are relative to a methodology, if he quits WK and goes to another methodology, for sure they will show radicals in a different way. So it would be a waste of time memorizing them.

When radicals appear in my reviews (I use anki mode) I just set them to right and move on.

Recently I was even talking to a coworker, japanese descendant, and I showed her the wk reviews and she was reading the kanji with TOTAL different radicals reading. I was like “da hell…” :rofl:

I don’t understand. Are you using your own names for the radicals? How are you memorizing kanji without knowing what the radicals mean?

Not sure what you mean here, of course she doesn’t know the wanikani radicals. As for different readings, wanikani doesn’t teach us all the readings of a kanji, just the most common ones.

the wanikani radicals are a mnemonic aid made to help us remember the meanings and readings of kanji, they’re basically half of what we’re paying for:p Without them you could just brute force the information in Anki for free right?

I concur on the enjoy the ride while it’s easy part… bud, I studied Japanese kanji since I was 17 years old when I found Kanji Gold back in the day. I had a Japanese course in College and then a couple years ago I went to school in Japan for almost 2 years…

I’m gonna recommend just going through and… don’t just rely on WaniKani’s memes (sometimes they really do makes some good ones though, but I found that making my own has helped a lot!)… start making your own, it becomes it’s own skill. So you can start honing that skill now with kanji maybe you don’t have something for or… a radical.

If you keep at it, you will understand the complete insanity of what you got yourself into… and you’ll look back on these times and wish you could stop the monster from attacking you… ruthlessly every day non stop for 24 hours a day… DEMANDING you burn his children into charred pieces of coal.

YOU ENJOY YOUR CHILDHOOD GODDAMNIT!!!

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I just see the radicals for the first time in lessons, of course, but I dont try to memorize them, I memorize the kanji with mnemonics, that’s the most important.

I started doing that right in the beginning because I was confusing a lot of radical “names” with its kanji. My accuracy was bad because of that.

Works for me.

So you just read the story and memorize it but can’t really dissect kanji into components? I still have a hard time understanding how you’re doing this Lol.

How does one look at a kanji of 3 or 4 radicals and be able to remember the story if you don’t know what each radical means? Can you give an example of how you do this?

“So you just read the story and memorize it but can’t really dissect kanji into components”

exactly this :smile:

I dont have a lot of free time, specially after you enter hell levels, that’s is woking for me.

Wish really hard.

That tends to work with WaniKani.

If it doesn’t, then the Crabigator decided to not hear your pleas for Japanese fluency and will direct you instead to learn Japanese from the mighty A-san.

A-san-Might-A-san-and-his-mystical-adventures-throughout-the-world (1)

=== and more fun stuff ===

I got a scammer to take this picture many years ago while living in Japan.

Enjoy… and remember, Praise A-san!