I only can remember a vocab when I see it

Hi,

Been here on WK for 2 years, burned almost 1500 words, but I noticed that the learning I am getting is purely visual, meaning, If I see a word or Kanji, I will know how to write it or how it sounds, but for example if I want to remember how to say the same word, without looking, most of the time I fail, do I need to add some more extra study by memorizing the meaning aside from just visual memorization?

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You can try one of the apps that was made specifically for this.
That means either KameSame
Or KaniWani

They are meant to teach you recall.
Though the other question is how much immersion you are doing on the side? Just wanikani won’t really teach you much alone, you will need to put in some extra time consuming either books or some sort of video/anime/movies

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I find that WK doesn’t really teach me the vocab, mostly the kanji. I really remember the individual words when I encounter them in the wild.

The problem with WK IMO is lack of context and many synonyms taught at once, and often you’re taught rare and common words at the same time, making it hard to gauge how important a given vocabulary item really is.

Very often I will see a word somewhere outside of WK, manage to read it because of my understanding of the kanji, and then double check to make sure I got it right only to discover that I actually already learned the word in WK ten levels ago.

So I’d say not to worry too much about it, trust the process and if consider the things you learn on WK to be “latent” knowledge that will unlock itself as you consume more material.

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The immersion is not what I would be satisfied with, I speak other languages, and I try to watch Japanese series and movies on Netflix, also some interesting videos on Youtube, I also used to follow a podcast-like teaching program for Japanese, that I could listen while commuting, but once the subscription ended I didn´t renew since I am waiting for a good offer, I will check out these two App´s you suggested, Thanks for that, and let´s see.

I noticed too something similar, for obvious reasons, it’s very easy to remember vocabs I heard in anime but can’t learn stuff I read. Wanikani elements are actually fine tho.
But if I try learning vocabs I read in manga or LN I just can’t

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Sure, I am happy with the progress I am making on Kanji and vocab learning, although reading the news on Twitter can be disappointing when I don´t find a word that I learned! but I guess when I reach level 30 or something maybe that will be fixed, I am on level 21 now.

There’s certainly also a “critical mass” factor with vocabulary. I think there’s a psychological aspect at play: if I read something expecting not to understand most words, then I’m less likely to recognize a word that I actually know but not well.

If on the other hand I read something expecting to understand mostly everything, it’s more likely that I’ll manage to catch those words, especially if I understand the context well.

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same here, I always thought that this happened to everyone

for example right now I cant even remember the kanji for swim (If I would try to write it, I could confuse with ice easily), but when I read I identify them easily.

maybe it is part of the process of learning until I can remember them without seeing them.

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You likely need production practice. Write sentences on paper, in the Japanese Sentence a Day thread or literally anywhere else :smiley: .

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Reading. That’s the best way to resolve this issue.

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This is normal. I agree with everyone that says gotta read, listen etc.

Words go through many stages from passive to active vocab. That is basically what you are describing. You probably have to encounter the words in the wild many times for that. It could be dozens of times. It could be 1 time. I think it matters how important the word is to you. For example your brain likes the word that lets you order dinner more than maybe a physics term.

Good luck!

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sort of unrelated: hi! congratulations on your first post!

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I find WaniKani more suited for reception (immersion) purpose than production, and that includes listening. And more on Kanji side, so sometimes new vocabularies bearing the Kanji can be guessed and easily remembered. (Not perfectly, and it depends.)

Things like KaniWani may help with remembering the reading, without relying on Kanji.

Nonetheless, my recommendation would be watching with JP sub. Otherwise, listening with follow-along text. Next time, hopefully, listening without seeing the vocab might work.

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Thanks alot

I was in the same position. Kamesame is the answer.

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Thanks, I started with Kaniwani, is there any differences between Kamesame and Kaniwani?

kamesame handles alternate correct answers much better than kaniwani (unless kaniwani has improved significantly since i’ve used either).

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