I am writing the JLPT N5 in less then a month!

Hey Everyone! I am going to be writing the JLPT N5 on December 2nd and I feel really nervous!

I have been studying Japanese for a couple of years, finished Genki 1, Japanese for busy people 1. I am using bunpro and working through Japanese for busy people 2 to keep my grammar sharp. I also have the ultimate JLPT N5 vocabulary on anki finished(93%). I just started Wanikani in September, I unfortunately found it late. I will probably have my Wanikani level around 7-8 maybe 9 if I am lucky by the time I write the test.

Does anyone with past experience writing the N5 know if this is enough? Thanks! :slight_smile:

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It is definitely enough.

https://www.wkstats.com/#charts.jlpt
chrome_2018-11-04_16-38-41

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Yeah, I did N5 after Nakama 1 (roughly equivalent to Genki 1) and Japanese for Busy People 1, and passed easily. Just make sure you practice listening, because you need to pass each section separately.

(On a small side note, I’m not sure if English is your first language, but it’s a little odd to say you’re “writing” the JLPT - sounds like you’re the one creating the exam paper in the first place. It’s more natural to say you’re “taking” or “sitting” a test.)

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Yeah, I’ve heard “make a test” to mean “take a test” from some non-natives as well.

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Hi @anon80613801! There’s no way you can be 100% prepared for a test like this, but it sounds like you’ve got it covered. :relaxed: Best of luck and try to enjoy it rather than get nervous.

Maybe OP is actually writing the test in 1 month. That’s why the urgency :eyes:

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I’ve heard people from Canada use “writing a test” before.

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Hey everyone! Thank you for all the positive responses! I can confirm that I am Canadian! When I saw @belthazar response I became slightly confused. Had I been talking about writing tests, taking tests, sitting tests wrong all my life? I asked some of my friends and they also said they would write my question the way I did.

Sorry for the slight misunderstanding!

Once I write the test, i’ll jump back in here and let everyone know how it went! To anyone sitting on a JLPT :sweat_smile: がんばって

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Shouldn’t it actually be “bubble fill” the JLPT? There’s no writing at all :wink:

When I googled “write a test”, the first result was about Germans who use the literal word for “write” as their test taking verb.

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Canuck here: yes, we use “writing” in that way; “I’m writing the entrance exam on Wednesday.” for example.

:canada:

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Wait, it is??? 0.0 English is my first language and that’s all I’ve ever said …

That sounds even stranger to my ears :joy:

We only say this in Canada? O.o I am confusion … I thought that “writing a test” was said everywhere … :exploding_head:

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Here’s a fellow north USA Canadian here. I do hear people say “Write a test” and I sometimes use that, but I most commonly use and hear “Take a test”.

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To be fair, “sitting a test” and “taking a test” don’t make sense either. Are you sitting on the test? Taking it home with you? We should all start a movement to change it to “answer a test”.

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Congratulations, you now have the power to confuse Australians (who only write tests if they are making other people sit them) :joy:

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And people say Japanese is confusing…

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To my ear, it should be sitting for a test, but maybe that’s just me.

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It’s apparently correct as well.
Just googling about it, I ended up on an old article from the Guardian that states:

Thousands more teenagers are sitting GCSEs at least one year early,

(emphasis mine)
It might be a BrE versus AE thing.

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My wife (an American) went to a veterinary school in Canada.

Her first year:

Me: How’s it going? Do you like it up there?
Her: It’s really nice… but I can’t get used to how they talk up here!
Me: What do you mean?
Her: Well, for instance, the Canadian students all say “I’m writing an exam” instead of “I’m taking an exam.” It makes no sense!
Me: Hmmm… to be fair, does “taking” an exam really make any more sense though?
Her: Maybe not, but “writing”? If students are “writing” the exam, then what are the professors who made the exam doing? It’s just too weird!

Her fourth year:

Me: How’s your week going?
Her: It’s really busy! I have a presentation due, and then tomorrow I have to write an exam and…
Me: sniggers
Her: Huh? What?
Me: You’re doing what to your exam tomorrow?
Her: I’m… oh. Shut up. :angry:
Me: :grin:

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Fun fact: it was on this very forum that I learned the English “revise” for a test, where Americans would say study.

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Today I learnt that Canadians talk weird. :stuck_out_tongue:

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