Grrrrrrr WaniKani!

Flashcard Dishonesty haha… that reminds me though of a video about the Iversen method. I think someone else on WKC already linked this…

Double Check is a userscript, and like other userscripts (except Ultimate Timeline, Heatmap, and Jitai) should never be installed anywhere.

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If you don’t install Leech Tables once you hit Burn reviews, that’s just masochism.

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  • Honesty :x:
  • Humility :x:
  • Wisdom :x:

I knew there were reasons I shouldn’t use it. Just couldn’t put names to them…

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Just know that if you use the Double Check script, cheating on an item only cheats you out of learning, which is what you’re here to do :slight_smile:

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I’m shocked that you don’t have the best one of all, Keisei 形声 Semantic-Phonetic Composition!!

Then there’s also this one, but Keisei is still the true game changer:

 

Keisei shows you all sorts of shortcuts for on’yomi readings, like 項, 攻, 貢, 虹, 江, 功, 紅 all have コウ as a common reading because of the component in them, for example. It’ll also show you exceptions, like is actually read as クウ (instead of コウ) in compound words :wink:

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Keisei is a game changer. You find out the way they made 90% of kanji back in the day is by going “sounds like another kanji but is THIS kind of thing”.

Then you find out that there’s a ton of exceptions but still. :slight_smile:

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I wholeheartedly agree. Once I realized all kanji with the squid radical had the reading of けん, I found out about semantic-phonetic composition stuff, everything got just so much easier.

True, but it’s better to learn two exceptions than 10 separate readings.

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On that note, if you’d like to see these all in one place, just go to this link and scroll down to the “Results” tables :wink:

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Neat!

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If @acm2010 made a paid app version of Keisei for iPhone I’d definitely buy it.

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Luckily, I don’t use user scripts. For this reason.

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It’s possible to use it only for honest mistakes, you know.

It’s also very possible for you to have the right idea, but if you don’t phrase it exactly as the answer was originally phrased, you’ll be marked wrong. That’s not even a mistake on the user’s part, that’s a simple oversight or flaw that you can correct with Double Check.

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I second that. For example, yesterday I had 休学, for which I put ’to be absent from school’. WRONG! The ‘correct’ answer is ‘absent from school’. I felt the frustration bubbling up again, but then, luckily, I had Double Check installed and everything was good again. Kudos to Pep95 for suggesting it!

Edit: I know that two kanjis by themselves do not technically constitute a verb. But add する and they do. The point is: I clearly got the meaning 100% correct and I don’t want to be punished for extrapolating it to some real-world usage.

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Just like having to use the infinitive form with ‘to’ at the start to indicate verbs, it might be a good idea for WK to require ‘something’ at the end of transitive verb phrases.
For example:
閉める : to shut something (transitive)
閉まる : to shut (to be shut) (intransitive)

It would be more to type, but we’d be more inclined to remember which is which.

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Unfortunately the “something” doesn’t always make sense. For example, 泊める is the transitive version of 泊まる, but I don’t think there’s a reasonable way to include “something” in the translation. (Of course in this case, the definitions would likely be worded so differently you couldn’t mix them up by accident.)

Similarly, using “to be” for all intransitive verbs gives the misconception that intransitive is the same thing as passive, which it is not.

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Yes, and at this point I’d just be happy with a little consistency in the format of the answer for the counter ones. How about “counter for (thing in the plural)” and not sometimes want “(thing singular) counter” and sometimes “(thing plural) counter” and sometimes just (thing plural).

It seems like they’ve cleaned that up some though, so maybe they’re ahead of me.

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oof the counter ones kill me. ‘Small animal counter’ or ‘counter for small animals’?
I do all my reviews on mobile so thank goodness for Tsurukame’s quick, “My answer was correct” button.

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“let” might work better

To let the door open (kinda weird)
To let someone stay over. (WK actually uses this)

Still, not perfect. But I think there should be some kind of extra word to help us distinguish the transivitiviodedousnouss. (transience?) haha

Edit" transitivity. DUh

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