Grammar for N5

Do i have to do Genki II for N5. I have finished Genki I, should focus on perfecting genki I or should i try to wrap up genki II as well? This is for N5 btw

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Genki 1 and 2 should get you most of the way to N4, I studied both and I found that that was pretty much the case. If I were you I would start on Genki 2 becasue the grammar and vocab stack so it’s not really a chore to start number 2. But maybe find some N5 practice tests too, as a way to prep for the content and time frame. Good luck!

Genki I is 99% of N5.
Genki II is the majority of N4.
(Not sure about the newest editions as I used the 2nd edition.)

This is because there isn’t really a definitive list for the JLPT and things move around over time.
If you’re comfortable with your knowledge of the grammar points in the books then you should be able to pass with ease regarding grammar.

so its better to perfect genki 1 right? considering that theres only a week for the test

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For an N5 test, for sure.
If I remember correctly there will only 1 or 2 grammar points in Genki II that are N5 level.

I did the N5 last winter and was around halfway through Genki II at that point. I don´t think I ever saw a grammar point from Genki II on the test or the mock tests that I did. And some points in Genki I didn´t show up at all but have been all over my N4 Prep-books.
It´s definetly better to just focus on the grammar from Genki I. Since you are Lvl 20 on WK, Kanji should be covered as well, the only thing that might still be missing is some vocab (assuming Genki and WK are your only resources). I did an N5 Vocab Deck in preparation and I think there were a bunch of words that weren´t covered in Genki or WK, but I the majority of those didn´t show up anyway (of course this could change with another test).

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By finished, do you mean you finished all the exercises in the Genki workbook as well? Just reading the book without the doing exercises is not very useful.

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im currently doing it right now , should be done in 2 days. Grammar is definitely my weakness. Need to work on it.

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Out of curiosity, would doing N4 instead of N5 be an option for you? You could then do Genki 1+2, study a little bit for the test and pass it.

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In hindsight I could have enrolled for N4. But N4 would’ve been a bit of a grind for me and idt i wouldve completed the vocab or practiced enough to pass (I’m in college rn so no time). I do plan on writing n4 in december. I also dont wanna flunk the first JLPT i give, it would crush my confidence lol. It’s also not possible for me to switch levels rn/

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Makes sense! I think you should in general be fine with N5 if you do Genki however far you can (assuming you complete book 1) and then do some mock tests to get familiar with the exam.

One thing you might trip on is kanji - N5 has barely any. So any of the words you learned on WaniKani will be available only in kana.

However, passing N5 in general shouldn’t be too difficult. I remember I did one of the JapanesePod101 beginner courses, did some kanji flash cards on the side and was more or less ready for the exam. Not a perfect score obviously, but good enough to pass high.

how many questions does n5 have in total
i found a practice that had 8 kanji/vocab qs and 13 reading/grammar qs. It also had 8 listening questions.
Surely there are more questions right?? Or is this about right ?

edit: nvm there are WAY more questions

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I honestly don’t remember. I think the listening section had 20-something questions, but that’s it.

You can download 1 sample test from here: https://jlptsensei.com/downloads/jlpt-n5-practice-test/?utm_content=cmp-true

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