English to Japanese "Zen" study


#1

Would anyone be interested in my “zen” mode Chrome application?


It isn’t very “zen”…in fact it is an incredibly difficult, study your vocab in the opposite direction, kind-of-thing. The original goal of this was to send a set of words found by “Wanikanify” into a study mode that did exactly this (it was also a study in trying to replicate some of the WaniKani components as you can tell from my input box :).

It works great as a stand alone application, though, and there is no reason to tightly couple this to Wanikanify. Right now, it grabs your ‘studied’ vocab list from Wanikani and starts quizzing you.

It intentionally does not show number of correct/incorrect, but it will visually indicate a correct answer versus an incorrect answer. I suppose I wanted a place to study that did not harshly judge me.

I can keep hacking on this if you all think it’d be useful!


#2

Very interested! The reverse vocab decks floating around are great, but… I come here to get away from Anki.


#3

sounds great!  how does it handle synonyms?  Would it give all english answers in the question field?


#4

That looks amazing! The only thing is, there are some words that have the same English meaning, but are different Japanese words (for example, “to replace” would have both 代わる and 代える). Other than that, though, it seems perfect! 


#5

I just put this together this evening. I hadn’t thought of the synonym issue.  How would you solve the problem?

And just to reiterate, this is not an SRS substitute. It’s more like the “cram” mode in Anki.


#6

I would just accept both readings, just like Wanikani does for kanji, you know? And I completely agree, this would be a wonderful complement to Wanikani, where when you have finished all of your reviews and need more to satisfy your quench for kanji, this would be it! But anyways, what is “cram” mode? I’ve never used it…


#7

“Cram” mode is a certain mode in Anki that allows you to cycle through a set of vocabulary words until you feel like you’ve studied them. It was pretty useful when I felt as if I didn’t know my vocabulary very well, and I wanted to spend 10 minutes just going over them over and over.


#8

Sounds interesting but I don’t see a download link to try this out :o

Let me know when you have one up :smiley:


#9
zeldaskitten said... sounds great!  how does it handle synonyms?  Would it give all english answers in the question field?
 I think the actual challenge is when there is an english word with multiple japanese meanings, like "soon" and "recently".

#10

The best way I can think of to solve the obvious problem of multiple readings is to just accept all of them, but that won’t work because they will be different words, and so will accept different readings. Is there a way to accept either reading? Or, we could just leave it, because it doesn’t really make too big a difference, and it’s amazing already.


#11

Hi folks,

There isn’t a download yet because it isn’t finished :D. I wanted to see if there was any general interest before spending anymore time on it. I will do so today and tomorrow and put a release out. Stay tuned!


#12

This looks interesting! Keep on it! :slight_smile:


#13

I’d like to try it out for sure!


#14

This looks like a great project! I love wanikani but sometimes I feel like I need a little more practice before I tackle my reviews. I can’t wait to use it!


#15

I wonder if Viet or Koichi have any input on the affect extra review might have on memorization. As much as I want to try this I think the point of SRS is to study just before you forget to move things from your short term to your long term. If you continually are studying wouldn’t that just keep it in your short term? 

I’m definitely not a psychologist or anything so I have no idea what I’m talking about but… could this be detrimental?


#16
bquaal said... I wonder if Viet or Koichi have any input on the affect extra review might have on memorization. As much as I want to try this I think the point of SRS is to study just before you forget to move things from your short term to your long term. If you continually are studying wouldn't that just keep it in your short term? 

I'm definitely not a psychologist or anything so I have no idea what I'm talking about but... could this be detrimental?
 Yes. I suggest you only do this for burned items.

#17
finnra said...
bquaal said... I wonder if Viet or Koichi have any input on the affect extra review might have on memorization. As much as I want to try this I think the point of SRS is to study just before you forget to move things from your short term to your long term. If you continually are studying wouldn't that just keep it in your short term? 

I'm definitely not a psychologist or anything so I have no idea what I'm talking about but... could this be detrimental?
 Yes. I suggest you only do this for burned items.
 Yea, ideally this is the way to go. Technically speaking Guru'd items are already beyond the 'short term memory' stage but if you end up using this system then it'll mess with your long term recall of items and you won't be able to 'permanently' remember anything.

It would be great if the english-jap reviews could be done at the same time as the jap-eng review of the item. But i can think of way too many issues with that... hopefully viet/koichi have a solution :)

Edit: that said though i think this is a great idea, and i love how you've made it look. It's well worth the time and effort!

#18
bquaal said... I wonder if Viet or Koichi have any input on the affect extra review might have on memorization. As much as I want to try this I think the point of SRS is to study just before you forget to move things from your short term to your long term. If you continually are studying wouldn't that just keep it in your short term? 

I'm definitely not a psychologist or anything so I have no idea what I'm talking about but... could this be detrimental?
 I have thought about that. It's a good point. We certainly don't want to fill up our short term memory!


#19

I do actually work in neuropsychology, so I can speak to this to an extent (I’m not going to review the literature; sorry): for people with healthy memories,  the system here is effective (though I can’t speak to the intervals of spacing). It’s important to note that most people severely underestimate their learning (the concept, if I recall correctly, is called “judgement of learning”) when using spaced repetition systems. This may explain why people like the idea of early reviews. However, there is no real benefit of reviewing early, as far as I remember. Errors are very useful in learning, in healthy brains. Don’t stress out about it.

Early reviews/additional reviews will make recall easier the next time it comes up (since you’ve cut short the repetition interval). It may not benefit you much in the long term, but it’s unlikely it would harm things unless you’re doing massed repetition, anki-style (i.e., review 10 flashcards 50 times in one day, making their next review 3 years from now). If you’ve fast-forwarded through the spacing, you’re not going to show the same benefits and abilities.

Reverse vocab decks will likely help you in situations where you’re going from English to Japanese, as WK helps you go from Japanese to English. They may interfere with eachother, but the benefit may exceed the risk of interference.

As I’ve said, it’s been a while since I’ve done research on this. Memory is my field of work, but take what I say with a grain of salt.

TL;DR: Go ahead. It’s not going to mess with things too much.


#20

I’d vote for Enlightened items only, or an option to choose.