An anki deck for verb + adjective conjugation


#1

Hello everyone,

So over the last few days I’ve been working on an anki deck that focuses on practicing adjective and verb conjugation so I could conjugate faster in my head and also learn how to make anki decks. Pretty much every functionality in the deck was based off hinekidori’s anki WK decks as the quality of all his anki decks are amazing.



Download Link



The main goal of this deck is to speed up how long it takes you to conjugate adjectives and verbs into their numerous forms on the fly so you don’t trip up when trying to talk or write in Japanese.


This deck works by separating the adjectives and verbs into their different categories i.e. な-adj, い-adj, irr adj, 五段 verbs, 一段 verbs and irregular verbs and focusing on being able to conjugate the various adjective types and verb endings in an isolated environment so that when you come across a new word you’ll have the muscle memory of conjugating that word without having to recall another word that conjugates the same way.


For example you learn for む-verbs it changes from む -> んだ when in past, casual form so when you learn a new word like 読む you can instantly know that to change it to past tense it will simply become 読んだ without requiring to think of another word that conjugates the same such as 飲む.



It currently features:


- A countdown timer so you can get an idea of how long it takes you to produce the conjugation


- Input validation, you can type in your answer to further reinforce the conjugation


- A ton of conjugation forms such as (sorry for the long list):



Adjectives (な-adj, い-adj and いい):

1) Indicative Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


2) Past Indicative Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


3) Presumptive Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


4) Past Presumptive Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


5) Provisional Positive/Negative Form


6) Continuative Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


7) Conditional Casual /Polite + Positive/Negative Form


8) “Become” Form


9) “Looks like” Form


10) “Too much” Form



Verbs (る-verbs, い-verbs, する and 来る):


1) Present Casual 


2) Present Polite 


3) Present Negative Casual 


4) Present Negative Polite 


5) Te Form 


6) Past Casual 


7) Past Polite 


8) Past Negative Casual 


9) Past Negative Polite 


10) Potential Casual 


11) Potential Polite 


12) Potential Negative Casual 


13) Potential Negative Polite 


14) Volitional Casual 


15 )Volitional Polite 


16) Volitional Negative Casual 


17) Volitional Negative Polite 


18) Provisional Casual 


19) Provisional Negative Casual 


20) Passive Casual 


21) Passive Polite 


22) Passive Negative Casual 


23) Passive Negative Polite 


24) Causative Casual 


25) Causative Polite 


26) Causative Negative Casual 


27) Causative Negative Polite 


28) Causative-Passive Casual <-have to derive 


29) Causative-Passive Polite <-have to derive 


30) Causative-Passive Negative Casual <-have to derive 


31) Causative-Passive Negative Polite <-have to derive 


32) Past Volitional Casual 


33) Past Volitional Polite 


34) Past Volitional Negative Casual 


35) Past Volitional Negative Polite 


36) Progressive Casual 


37) Progressive Polite 


38) Progressive Negative Casual 


39) Progressive Negative Polite 


40) Past Progressive Casual 


41) Past Progressive Polite 


42) Past Progressive Negative Casual 


43) Past Progressive Negative Polite 


44) Conditional Casual  


45) Conditional Polite 


46) Conditional Negative Casual 


47) Conditional Negative Polite 



All the conjugation types were taken from 「waniconjugation.co.nf


If you like the concept please try it out and let me know of anything wrong you find, features you’d like, conjugations I’m missing or anything so that I can further improve the deck.




#2

I’m all for conjugation practice, but you honestly need like 6 of these forms (for verbs) mastered in order to not trip up on a regular basis, not 50 or whatever. I’m not sure how productive it is to spend time worrying about most of them. Pausing to say something that uses an unusual tense or aspect is something even native English speakers do. 


#3
Leebo said... I'm all for conjugation practice, but you honestly need like 6 of these forms (for verbs) mastered in order to not trip up on a regular basis, not 50 or whatever. I'm not sure how productive it is to spend time worrying about most of them. Pausing to say something that uses an unusual tense or aspect is something even native English speakers do. 
 I tried reading up on this, trying to figure out what the most commonly used conjugations are but couldn't really find a list or post explaining it. What verb conjugations would you consider that you'd need to absolutely master? Removing the less important conjugations wouldn't be that difficult for verbs as each conjugation is a separate note so the less important ones can be suspended while working on the more important ones.

#4
DiMono said...
Leebo said... I'm all for conjugation practice, but you honestly need like 6 of these forms (for verbs) mastered in order to not trip up on a regular basis, not 50 or whatever. I'm not sure how productive it is to spend time worrying about most of them. Pausing to say something that uses an unusual tense or aspect is something even native English speakers do. 
 I tried reading up on this, trying to figure out what the most commonly used conjugations are but couldn't really find a list or post explaining it. What verb conjugations would you consider that you'd need to absolutely master? Removing the less important conjugations wouldn't be that difficult for verbs as each conjugation is a separate note so the less important ones can be suspended while working on the more important ones.
 Yeah, sorry for giving a vague, relatively negative, unhelpful response. It's hard to say without facts to back it up, but I feel like if you can do the casual and polite forms for the present, past, negative, passive, potential, and toss in the te form, you're pretty much covered. I realize that's more like 10 or 12, but they have different levels of usefulness, and therefore different levels of priority you should put on them. EDIT: Volitional might be more useful than passive.

I'd say present, past, negative and te form will take care of a huge percentage of what you need to say on a regular basis. You do need to know the rest if you want to read and stuff, but the practicing here meant to foster quick thinking, and having to juggle 50 forms at once probably hinders that.

#5

@DiMono - It looks like you took inspiration from some of my decks. This is fine and I don’t mind at all, but are you aware that I already made a Conjugation deck?

You can find it here → [Conjugations] 

It may help with some of the problems I’m seeing in the deck you posted.

Good luck! :slight_smile:


#6

Leebo said...
DiMono said...
Leebo said... I'm all for conjugation practice, but you honestly need like 6 of these forms (for verbs) mastered in order to not trip up on a regular basis, not 50 or whatever. I'm not sure how productive it is to spend time worrying about most of them. Pausing to say something that uses an unusual tense or aspect is something even native English speakers do. 
 I tried reading up on this, trying to figure out what the most commonly used conjugations are but couldn't really find a list or post explaining it. What verb conjugations would you consider that you'd need to absolutely master? Removing the less important conjugations wouldn't be that difficult for verbs as each conjugation is a separate note so the less important ones can be suspended while working on the more important ones.
 Yeah, sorry for giving a vague, relatively negative, unhelpful response. It's hard to say without facts to back it up, but I feel like if you can do the casual and polite forms for the present, past, negative, passive, potential, and toss in the te form, you're pretty much covered. I realize that's more like 10 or 12, but they have different levels of usefulness, and therefore different levels of priority you should put on them. EDIT: Volitional might be more useful than passive.

I'd say present, past, negative and te form will take care of a huge percentage of what you need to say on a regular basis. You do need to know the rest if you want to read and stuff, but the practicing here meant to foster quick thinking, and having to juggle 50 forms at once probably hinders that.
Nothing to be sorry about, I'll try suspending the rest of the verb conjugations and work on the important ones and slowly introduce the less important conjugations later on.

hinekidori said... @DiMono - It looks like you took inspiration from some of my decks. This is fine and I don't mind at all, but are you aware that I already made a Conjugation deck?

You can find it here → [Conjugations] 

It may help with some of the problems I'm seeing in the deck you posted.

Good luck! ^_^
Yeah, it was actually that deck that inspired me to make mine. As much as I liked your deck, the main issue I had with it was that it forced me to practice the conjugation forms with a lot of vocabulary that I didn't know forcing to have to learn a word when I wanted to solely focus on improving my conjugation, I initially got around this by just suspending the words I didn't know but it got tedious when I had to unsuspend a word whenever I learnt a new verb/adjective to add it into my reviews.

Also thanks for the anki tutorials that you made, it helped a lot when I was making my deck.

#7
DiMono said...Yeah, it was actually that deck that inspired me to make mine. As much as I liked your deck, the main issue I had with it was that it forced me to practice the conjugation forms with a lot of vocabulary that I didn't know forcing to have to learn a word when I wanted to solely focus on improving my conjugation, I initially got around this by just suspending the words I didn't know but it got tedious when I had to unsuspend a word whenever I learnt a new verb/adjective to add it into my reviews.

Also thanks for the anki tutorials that you made, it helped a lot when I was making my deck.
 Oh, I see! It seems a shame to not have the input box working. Using my original deck as a base, I removed all the vocabulary and made a couple of edits so that typing the answer would be possible if this is something you would like. Hopefully this is a good base you can work off of to add the rest of your preferences.

I hope you find it helpful! 

Here you go → [DiMono Conjugation Deck] 

#8
hinekidori said...
DiMono said...Yeah, it was actually that deck that inspired me to make mine. As much as I liked your deck, the main issue I had with it was that it forced me to practice the conjugation forms with a lot of vocabulary that I didn't know forcing to have to learn a word when I wanted to solely focus on improving my conjugation, I initially got around this by just suspending the words I didn't know but it got tedious when I had to unsuspend a word whenever I learnt a new verb/adjective to add it into my reviews.

Also thanks for the anki tutorials that you made, it helped a lot when I was making my deck.
 Oh, I see! It seems a shame to not have the input box working. Using my original deck as a base, I removed all the vocabulary and made a couple of edits so that typing the answer would be possible if this is something you would like. Hopefully this is a good base you can work off of to add the rest of your preferences.

I hope you find it helpful! 

Here you go → [DiMono Conjugation Deck] 
 Oh wow thanks for doing that! Looks a lot more organized and will be a great template to work off!

EDIT: Also could you explain how you use the baseX fields? I think I have an idea of what's going on but there's just a lot of cards to look through to make sure I understand what each base is for when as I'm trying to add notes for the irregular verbs する and くる



#9
DiMono said...
hinekidori said...
DiMono said...Yeah, it was actually that deck that inspired me to make mine. As much as I liked your deck, the main issue I had with it was that it forced me to practice the conjugation forms with a lot of vocabulary that I didn't know forcing to have to learn a word when I wanted to solely focus on improving my conjugation, I initially got around this by just suspending the words I didn't know but it got tedious when I had to unsuspend a word whenever I learnt a new verb/adjective to add it into my reviews.

Also thanks for the anki tutorials that you made, it helped a lot when I was making my deck.
 Oh, I see! It seems a shame to not have the input box working. Using my original deck as a base, I removed all the vocabulary and made a couple of edits so that typing the answer would be possible if this is something you would like. Hopefully this is a good base you can work off of to add the rest of your preferences.

I hope you find it helpful! 

Here you go → [DiMono Conjugation Deck] 
 Oh wow thanks for doing that! Looks a lot more organized and will be a great template to work off!

EDIT: Also could you explain how you use the baseX fields? I think I have an idea of what's going on but there's just a lot of cards to look through to make sure I understand what each base is for when as I'm trying to add notes for the irregular verbs する and くる


 They represent the different forms a base can take in a conjugation. 

For example - く→ きます where you see く change to き. Depending on the conjugation it can be converted into か, き, け, or こう.

The same would apply for the other forms. る → ら, り, れ, or ろう

This allows me to build the conjugation when I place it in the card like so.

{{Base2}}ます as the answer for the input box.

&

<span class="border">{{Base2}}</span>
<span class="border">ます</span>

For the back of the card. That way I can represent the parts that make up the conjugation.

Hope that makes sense.