Am I on the right track with my plan?

Quick note, you need to get use to that beginner frustration stage.
Japanese isn’t like most topic, the learning curve is super slow so don’t stress yourself.

If you want to see some progress quick, the most rewarding book and praised by almost everyone is “Genki I”. It gives you access to the beginner level of japanese without any trouble.

Bunpro is good but if you are a complete beginner with the language you are jumping too many steps in my opinion. Same for japanese 101… it’s nice but you should cover some basics before jumping into it.

Also take some time to read this article :

You will get a better understanding of what to do and why :slight_smile:

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Thanks for the vote of confidence and the reassurance. This is probably the most difficult thing I have tackled from a learning perspective, so its hard to not get discouraged.

I have just started using DeerLingo on mobile because I am not always able to access a book to study while I work and I have heard that it is comparable to what is taught in Genki 1 and 2, just in a different format. I do plan to move to Genki though once I really make this a strong habit and can invest in learning.

How far does lingodeer go, for the JLPT? Like to N4 or just N5

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As I have just begun using it, I am not exactly sure. A quick search on Google gave me mixed responses, from N4 to N5, and apparently talks of updates to get you to N3? But I cannot validate any of that…

Maybe someone else in the community with more experience with LingoDeer can be of more help? Sorry :frowning: Wish I could be of more help.

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Studying LingoDeer all the way through their Japanese II course will get you to about N4 grammar, same as Genki II would.

That being said you will need more vocabulary. The vocab covered in LingoDeer Japanese I is just shy of 500 words, about 2/3 what one would need for N5. Similarly for Japanese II/N4. If you keep up with WaniKani while working your way through LingoDeer, though, you would have more than sufficient vocab.

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Glad you showed up for the clarification Erie-san, ありがとう!

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No problem. And honestly, if you try and like LingoDeer, there’s no particular reason to also “move onto” Genki. I did that for fear of missing out (LingoDeer was newer, still free and in beta) and it was all redundant. You’ve got so much ahead of you to learn there’s no need to be learning something twice!

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I think that a really important point. I think a lot of the struggle for most people is figuring out their plan and not go overboard on resources, or going “under”-board per-say. I definitely find more struggle in trying to decide what resources to use/ how to integrate them then the earlier lessons on LingoDeer and WK.

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You’ll figure out quickly what works for you and what doesn’t. Learning a language is a long-term affair. If you’ve given some tool or resource a fair shot for 3-4 months and you’re not enjoying it, you’re not going to keep at it or anything similar everyday for a year, or 3, or 5. You have to have fun. :slight_smile:

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Couldn’t agree more and appreciate the solid advice.

Not to keep requesting information, but in terms of LingoDeer, do you know of any good Japanese keyboard apps for android? I like it a lot but I want to refrain from relying on Romaji and translators for the reviews and lessons involving typing in the characters to write out a sentence.

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I’m not quite sure what you mean. There’s no actual keyboard input for any of LingoDeer’s lessons.

Also, while you’re in a lesson, click the gear icon on the top right and it will give you a bunch of language display options. You can and should turn off romaji here, at your stage probably switching it to “Japanese + Hiragana” would be best. This setting will carry over to all other lessons.

Hmmm, in the nationality lesson in Japanese 1, it asks you to type out phrases like “I am American” using the kana and kanji that you learned prior in the lesson, hence the need to use a keyboard that allows you to access all Kana and can auto-correct to the appropriate kanji based on Kana inputs.

Maybe this is a new feature? I am honestly not sure and wish I could provide a screenshot or something for context.

Good plan! Once you get a bit better at basic grammar and kanji, I suggest you try and pick up some graded readers or beginners’ manga to practice reading. It’s easier to reinforce vocabulary when you see it in the wild. Good luck! :slight_smile:

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I’m pretty sure there is an option at the bottom of the screen allowing you to switch to a word bank instead of Japanese keyboard.

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I will definitely check that!

Ended up getting a Japanese keyboard app anyway so I can text my sister who is also learning in Japanese, and one hopefully switch our conversations to 100% Japanese!

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I’ve learned multiple languages in the past and I can confidently say that textbooks are worth their weight in gold for grammar.
Some have already suggested Genki I and II but I would like to +1 that suggestion.

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Simeji is a popular Android phone keyboard. I use it as my default one, as you can toggle between English and Japanese on-the-fly. It also offers both qwerty and swipe keyboards for Japanese, and loads of other features/customisation.

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Thank you for the info! I will look into it, I ended up just grabbing the highest rated one haha :slight_smile:

Good idea, thanks! Do you have any recommended places online that I could find these articles and beginner manga (free or paid)?

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A lot of people use NHK Web News Easy and there are some nice free stories for beginners here. Here’s a full list of different resources you can use for reading, grammar, listening, and more.
I recently bought graded readers from White Rabbit Express. I’m really enjoying them, although they are kind of pricey, there are lots of free alternatives online.
readers

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