Week 7: 博士の愛した数式 - The Housekeeper and the Professor 🎓🧮

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博士の愛した数式 - The Housekeeper and the Professor :mortar_board::abacus: Home Thread

Week 7

hakase

Start Date: Oct 31st
Previous Part: Week 6
Next Part: Week 8

Reading:

Week Start Date End Phrase End Page End Percentage Page Count
Week 7 Oct 31st 助けてやってください。お願いします。 107 36% 13

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Now that’s an ominous sounding ending line I wish I hadn’t read. :sweat_smile: No promises on being able to stop at that point in the story!

1 Like

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why I don’t eat apples.

3 Likes

That was a nice and everyday emergency. :sweat_smile: Poor professor!

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I suspect that was another glimpse on the backstory of why the professor was so worried about Root… I’m sensing some real drama here :cry:

2 Likes

You don’t have to peel them (at least not with a Japanese knife)!

7 Likes

I was taught a long time ago that it is even healthier if you don’t peel them, but I did not know that this wisdom extended so far :rofl:

6 Likes

So, err, I’m a bit late, but this week features the twin prime conjecture and I just had to comment on it, since it’s one of those conjectures that I keep track of. In particular it has gotten a lot progress in recent years, a paper from 2014 showing for instance that there are infinitely many primes separated by at most 246.
I had to google the exact number and found this page which gives a nice summary of the progress on the conjecture. I was also sad to see that one of the fun results is from 1976, and thus 博士 just missed it :sob:

6 Likes