Rrrrrrrrrrr pronunciation

I just said “buddy” aloud and I think I know what you mean :slight_smile: . I still pronounce the Japanese “r” differently, though. Like in られた my tongue does what @Jonapedia pretty much explained.

But the r/l switch I only do when singing.

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Hahaha i just try blowing air on the tip of my tongue, its just making a “sss” sound. I definitely cant do that.
It is a front rolled “R”, no uvula involved, i dont think the french or germans speak like that either.
We make the sound by rapidly vibrating the roof of our mouth and gently blowing or inhaling air along it, you can keep it rolling indefinitely that way. But in japanese its just a single “R” a instant stop immediately followed by whatever may come after. I think its a combination of a french “R” and a spanish “R”, the french way sounds very similair. But i dont speak french, nor spanish, nor german.

I do want to learn spanish too though.

Another weird pronunciation from my native language is the “G” which is similair to “R” but more back rolled, and far faster. But since i know the english “G” that wont be a issue.

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This is a sung rather than spoken example, but listen to the way he says くれた here at 2:05:

It’s not so much specific words that have a harder ‘d’ sound but I think that ‘r’ sounds following ‘u’ vowels are more likely to sound like ‘d’.

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My wife tells me that when I say “enchilada” it sounds like “enchilara”

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Hahaha where are you from? Is this because of your japanese studies? Or was it prevelant before?
I just realized i made my first typo cause i was thinking in japanese sounds when texting my brother earlier.

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I’m from California, native English speaker, so I get to struggle with both Spanish Rs and Japanese Rs haha. My wife is from Mexico

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Oh thats too sweet. Hey at least you speak one language far better than me, and in the vain of valentines day, its the language of love <3

I could honestly use some pointers in that too lol.

  • you definitely speak better japanese too considering youre level 60.
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Hmm maybe it’s because he pauses slightly after the く sound, but I hear a very clear, flat “r” afterwards. It’s a very nice “r” actually :grin:.

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Yeah, I hear it as れ too, but it’s the closest example I can think of to a sound someone who wasn’t really used to Japanese might hear as that harder sound. It also contrasts well with the softer る that comes after which should make it easier to hear.

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Totally unrelated but :joy_cat:
Spanish pronunciation of “d” is very close to a very soft English “th” in my experience (at least in some regions) so you might get better results with trying to swap that in? I.e. “enchilatha”

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When I was studying Castilian Spanish, what I learnt was that this pronunciation is used for a D at the end of a word, like in “capacidad” or “verdad”. However, maybe it’s more common in other positions in other regions or types of Spanish.

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Yep, that of course holds true for the “standard” pronunciation. I was more thinking of e.g. how the people in the Madrid region slightly change this pronunciation, e.g. when you listen to this person saying “Madrid”: Pronounced words by UwwU in Forvo. then the “d” at the end changes into a devoiced “s”-something while the “d” in the middle gets more of a soft “th” pronunciation (or at least it sounds like that to my German ear which is definitely more used to a much harder “d” anyways :woman_shrugging:)

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Here’s what Wikipedia says to that:

That kind of matches my impression I’ve had so far. So, all of these /d/s in “capacidad” and “verdad” would be realised similarly to a “soft th”.

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Interesting. Well, I guess I’ll look into it and listen more closely when I start Spanish again. :slight_smile:

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You know what, I think that helps a lot! When I pronounce the D as a voiced T it is too powerful, but if I put my tongue in the TH position while continuing to voice it and keeping some of the plosiveness of a T, it sounds pretty good to my ear. I’ll have to check with my wife when she gets off work haha

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I’m by no means well-versed in Spanish, so please take this with a grain of salt, but to me it sounds like a massive improvement :tada: Please let me know what your wife thinks!

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