Kanji book sorted by reading

こんいちはみなさん!

So I started out wanting a way to sort the kanji of Wanikani by (first, primary, easily digestible by WK) reading, partly to deal with all of the homonymic ones. And I ended up making a book out of resulting files as a kind of master reference to WK kanji. Not sure if this belongs under third party apps, since it is a printable book, but I did use my favorite combo of bash scripting plus \LaTeX to do this. In case anyone might find this useful in their travels in Kanjiland here are some pdf files.

But first here is the book, a crude but workable reference. I used a thread that was probably too thick for the job, but this was my first ever hand bound book, and next time I’ll use lighter weight thread.

Many pages have lists of single kanji with a couple of homonyms, but the whole prints out on thirty two sheets of paper.

And the Coptic stitch binding:

The first two pdfs below are for printing double sided and binding as a book in signatures of sixteen pages. There are two versions, one with a sans serif font like the default WK font and one with the stroke order font. Since they print 4 pages per sheet, that means that you fold each sheet in half and group them in sets of 4 sheets which is good for a hand sewn binding. I followed a nice tutorial on Youtube from Sea Lemon for making a book using Coptic stitch for mine. If you prefer full sheets for regular old printing there are two other pdfs linked below again one with plain sans serif kanji and one done with the stroke order font.

The kanji in all of these are ordered “alphabetically” using the first WK reading. Because of the way computers sort kana the characters with a “ten ten” get placed after the same character without. In other words the order is か、が、き、ぎ and not か、き、。。。が、ぎ as we (or at least I) might find more intuitive. But then kana are not an alphabet, so concepts of alphabetic ordering are maybe not appropriate. Still, they did get sorted and so you can look up the kanji by what WK picks out as the main reading and be truly alarmed at how many are read し or しょう.

Hope you like these!

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Oh this looks like a great idea. It is easier to remember the reading when you know which shares it.
I coudln’t get my printer to print double sided (when I tried in the past) so will probably just download and look at the PDF on my machine :durtle_noice:

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You could always print page per page, and turn the paper over every time.

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I guess, but not sure I feel the need to print it. So many pages and probably works just as well on the computer

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This must have been so much work!! Thank you for compiling it is such a nice way, I will be sure to print it out and use it as I advance!

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You could also take it to a print shop and for the price of a coffee, they could print it for you! I’ve been, um, sneaking into my office when no one is around to print lately. Shhhhh!

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Actually is wasn’t that much work, once I figured out how to tell my computer to sort the kanji and assemble the file! I definitely didn’t do it all manually otherwise I’d have given up before I got to か. :slight_smile:

I doubt it would cost that low here. High price R us! :money_with_wings:

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