JLPT Grammar preparation

Will learning N1 grammar and skipping the other 4, directly help me with understanding all the other grammar points(N2, 3, 4 and 5)?

It probably will not. And also, you likely wouldn’t understand them well. What makes a grammar point an N1 grammar point is that it is a very specific, limited, formal, or literary version of some other broader grammar point, typically.

The low-level ones are very broad and are the general glue that hold the language together. They are all taken for granted at the N1 level, and if you skipped them you’d be lost.

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I agree with Leebo. The grammar points from N5 and N4 are especially critical and provide a solid foundation for the language, upon which the other points are built. If you don’t have that foundation, I wouldn’t expect most of the N1 points to make sense.

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Can I jump in this thread and ask, will WaniKani do anything to help understand grammar, or should I be looking to outside resources for that? I’m only level 3, and I’m seeing things like い-adjectives, and verbs ending with う, but will it get more detailed and really provide grammar instruction?

WK item information might make oblique references to grammar, but it won’t teach you anything the way a grammar resource would. Other resources are absolutely necessary.

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Do you happen to have any suggestions? I’ve heard about thinks like Genki or Tae Kim’s Grammar Guide – are these a good place for a beginner?

The following thread is a compilation of resources that users have suggested/recommended in the past.

The topic of what grammar resources etc. people recommend often comes up here. I suggest that you take a look through the above and search through the forum for JLPT/Grammar recommendations. If there’s a resource that piques your interest you that you’d like to know more about, I’m sure people can give you more details.

Wish you the best with your studies!

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I’ve completed Genki I & II a couple months ago, I 100% recommend them.

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I’m following Japanese lessons right now every week and we pretty much get the basics. In what way would genki 1 and 2 be different?
Maybe that I can skip1 and contineu with 2 after this course, but maybe 2 would be unnecessary idk.

I have learned a lot already about. Wa, ga, to, mo, de, no, ni, negative/past/present/negative-past, i-adjective and na-adjective.

If you follow Genki at the same time, you’ll not only review everything you learned in your class, but also be sure that you’re learning everything a beginner should learn.

Plus Genki has a lot of different exercises for practice and repetition.

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you probably wouldn’t be able to even comprehend it, plus most resources starting from n2 sometimes even n3 are 100% in japanese. Do you think you could understand the grammar explanation?

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Genki is 100% in Japanese?

genki 1 is n5, genki 2 takes you to n4.
its still mostly in english

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I guess I will give Genki 1 a try after this class is over this summer.

No. N1 grammar is built upon the foundation of the earlier grammar. Trying to start with N1 would be like learning physics without ever studying arithmetic.

you could probably do them together, it probably covers alot of the same stuff