I did not plan to meet three "plan" kanji in one month

I just hit second “plan” kanji at level 22, and did little search thru WK assets for “plan”:

Kanji Plan:
策 (level 22)
案 (level 22)
企 (level 21)

Vocab:
計画 (famous “just according to keikaku”)

企画
予定

Apparently Japanese are very much into planning.

Do anyone have a plan to deal with these? How to remember and what are the nuances?

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I’m sure someone else could explain this better than me but I will give it a shot.

計画 plans like a schedule
策 plan like a policy
企画 plan as in a design or project
予定 plan as a schedule again but I think of it as like arragements more than plans.

Not fully sure on 企画 and 策 though.

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The most difficult to grasp is 企画. This is where a Japanese dictionary, such as Sanseido, comes to the rescue!

Word Definition My Quickie Translation
計画 事前に手順・方法を考えること. Thinking about procedure and method in advance.
はかりごと.対策.手段. Strategy. Measures. Means.
企画 計画 (ノ°Д°)ノ︵ ┻━┻
予定 日程や行動を前もって決めること. Deciding schedule and action in advance.
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We have words that are pretty similar in English too. Sometimes there is more than one word for a thing or the nuance is so close that one could use more or less interchangeably.

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A thesaurus is better for finding nuanced differences. Unfortunately, they tend to be written for natives, who generally aren’t going to be confused by exactly the same things, because their basis for confusion isn’t that two words share an English gloss.

So the words you find confusing aren’t directly compared. But more detail and usage info is supplied nonetheless.

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It’s the same in goo :grinning:

企画 : ある事を行うために計画をたてること。また、その計画
(ノ°Д°)ノ︵ ┻━┻

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I feel like “hypothesis” has got to be the most-represented word in WK…

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The thesaurus entry goes into more detail for 企画

「企画」「立案」は、事業や催し物などの計画を実行に先立って立てることをいう。

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Those thesaurus entries are quite amazing ! When looking stuff on goo, I really need to remember to scroll down to the 類語辞書 part.

Actually I wonder if there is such thesaurus for English ? The only one I know just dump a bunch of synonym or antonym, they never really get into details trying to explain exactly what distinguish words or showing stuff like the 対比表 of goo.

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Not a fan of the fans

団扇(うちわ)
扇(おうぎ)
扇子(せんす)
扇風機(せんぷうき)
扇ぐ(あおぐ)

I demand less demands

催促(さいそく)
要請(ようせい)
需要(じゅよう)
要求(ようきゅう)
請求(せいきゅう)
求める(もとめる)

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団扇 is a specific style of a handheld fan, best explained using a picture


扇 and 扇子 are pretty much the same. As I understand 扇子 means a folding fan usually made of bamboo strips, while 扇 is a more general term for a handheld fan but since folding fans are the most common it can be used interchangeably with 扇子. It seems 扇子 is more commonly used.

扇風機 is an electric fan

扇ぐ is a verb “to fan”

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Yes, pictures! Let’s ‘fan’ them out:

団扇(うちわ)
扇(おうぎ)・扇子(せんす)
扇風機(せんぷうき)

扇ぐ(あおぐ)

Screen Shot 2020-09-12 at 10.21.23 AM

Extras!

軍配・軍配団扇(ぐんばいうちわ)


https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/軍配

鉄扇(てっせん)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_war_fan

ヲタ(ファン)

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I feel like Level 14 introduced three or four different ways to say “completion”.

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Yep, I just did those vocab lessons today.

Complete. Completion. Perfect.

Which to use, which to use.

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To be fair, the silliest one I’ve seen so far is 材木 vs. 木材.

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https://community.wanikani.com/t/complaining-is-still-a-must/35475/692?u=trunklayer

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The kanji that comes first gives a clue there to what the focus is.

木材 is wood that you use as raw material for building something, and 木 comes first so it’s in a form that is closer to when it was a 木. That end of the spectrum. Most people do not need wood in this form.

材木 is wood that use you as raw material for building something, but 材 comes first so it’s in a form where it’s ready to use as a material. It’s been cut into specific lengths and can be used.

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扇子 are the folding kind, so it is very SENSible to bring one with you.

団扇 do not fold, so it is better to just keep it in your 家 (うち).

That’s how I remember those two types.

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The real etymology is actually a good mnemonic!It comes from 打ち羽 (strike-feather) because it is believed that those type of fan was first used to repel mosquitoes or flies, by striking the fan in the air to scare them away (打ち is the stem of the verb 打つ, to strike)

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