How are you watching Japanese Media?

What kind of words do you mean?

There are words that no one in polite Japanese society would use that do appear in Anime (お前 comes to mind).

I can speak for お前 because I went to Japan for work and had interesting conversations with the people I work with. We talked about Anime and they asked… “you use words like お前 when you speak in Japanese?”

Other than the fact that I can barely speak Japanese, I also learned early to be polite which unless you are in super comfortable situations with folks or are really trying to be mean, お前 simply wouldn’t be used.

And while not word specific, Japanese Man Yuta had this interesting (to me) video about Anime vs Real Life Japanese.

I subscribed to TV Japan

I have a tough time discussing TV Japan without foul language. :smiley:
I WANT TV Japan, but because I am a hipster cord cutter with YouTube TV, it’s simply not an option. I with they offered a streaming service with a Roku or Android app as I would subscribe to that in a second.

Next best option is the DLibrary Japan service which sadly doesn’t usually include subtitles for many of the shows. And on the few they do, it is English subtitles (nice for when I want to enjoy a show, bad when I want to practice my Japanese :smiley:)

I wasn’t trying to deny that there is a disconnect between “anime speech” and real life - there absolutely is. I was just wondering what was meant by “words” because to me, it has more to do with speech style and politeness levels than individual words, but your example of おまえ makes perfect sense.

That being said, I think that calling おまえ “a word that no one in polite Japanese society would use” is a bit of an exaggeration, as it does get used in casual conversations between close friends. Is it inappropriate to use in a large majority of circumstances? Absolutely, and I now understand what was meant and I can see how it’d be easy for a beginner to be confused about which words or phrases they should shy away from or not.

My point was that, aside from the flavor of the dialogue with things like おまえ or slurred speech like すんじゃねぇ and things like that, there are plenty of vocabulary words that you could pick up from anime which could help you to expand your vocabulary. It’s not like watching a SOL show is going to give you grossly misrepresentative dialogue either (not that it’s 1-to-1 with real conversational speech or anything); the main offender is shounen anime and/or fantasy genres. It’s not like anime uses made-up words for “fall” or “cat” or “love” or “house” or anything like that. It’s good to be cautious of copying anime speaking styles but it’s not like they aren’t speaking Japanese that you could learn something from.

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That being said, I think that calling おまえ “a word that no one in polite Japanese society would use” is a bit of an exaggeration, as it does get used in casual conversations between close friends. Is it inappropriate to use in a large majority of circumstances?

I guess based on my conversations with my coworkers, it sounded like they wouldn’t use おまえ/お前 outside of the close relationship you indicate (and the women in the group indicated they would never speak like that). So yes, an over exaggeration on my part.

Also, it is a small sample size of about 8-10 people, so definitely NOT indicative of all Japanese society based on just my conversations.

It’s not like anime uses made-up words for “fall” or “cat” or “love” or “house” or anything like that. It’s good to be cautious of copying anime speaking styles but it’s not like they aren’t speaking Japanese that you could learn something from.

Certainly and I agree.

If someone knows how words are “conjugated” and what the base is for something that an Anime character says as if they are a cat, vocabulary is vocabulary.

In fact, I find that when I hear a word in the overly dramatic Kansai dialect used in some Anime that I understand, I get stupidly excited. The Kansai dialect exists but in my limited experience in the area when I visited, it’s not nearly as overstated as I hear in Anime.

Something I haven’t seen anyone mentioning is Viki. It’s a free (with optional sub) Asian streaming service by Rakuten, and it has quite a few movies/tv shows (https://www.viki.com/explore?country=japan). ^^

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I haven’t seen anyone mentioning is Viki

I found a link to it in one of the big threads of resources on Friday and signed up. Haven’t yet dug in though, but if you have recommendations for great shows, please post them!

Not sure what’s available in your library since it varies from country to country, but I was personally a huge fan of Jin (https://www.viki.com/tv/32981c-jin and https://www.viki.com/tv/32982c-jin-final). It has a bit of a weird b-movie start in order to justify what happens, but after that it deals with the struggles of a modern-day surgeon in the Edo period in a quiet and compelling manner. It’s the adaptation of a seinen manga with the same name and has also won many awards. If you enjoy historical dramas and it’s available in your region, I very much recommend it! :slight_smile:

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Subs in the target language are really the way to go. I binged tons of shows in English wish English subs to get my listening comprehension on par. At some point you have to take off the training wheels, though. Best on shows you already know well.

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I hear あいかわらず in Japan. It’s not an “anime-specific word” or anything.

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Well I disagree 100% so agree to disagree.

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I honestly think the take-home message of this particular post is “don’t try to copy the speaking styles of coworkers who are at least twice your age and seniority level”. わし, for example, is used by old men. If you’re not an old man, it’s going to look weird.

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I’m definitely much better with reading than listening (this goes for French and Spanish too, which I’m also learning). It goes double for Japanese since my kanji knowledge is completely disproportionate to my understanding of grammar. I’ve read all of Genki I but am still in a beginner Japanese course since my university decided it’d be better to start from scratch since I hadn’t had any conversation practice.

I tend to be really bad at understanding spoken Japanese because of all the homonyms, and I can’t form half the words that I’m able to understand on paper with the help of the kanji. Pretty pathetic, I know. So I can’t really watch anime or anything without subtitles, especially since Japanese is one of the fastest spoken languages on the planet… But I am getting better at understanding what they’re saying when I walk away and have to go off audio.

I’ll be taking Japanese classes for the next 4 years of University, plus I’ll likely be studying abroad in Japan for a semester or a summer, so I’m not too worried about it just yet. I’ve picked up a couple of simple Japanese manga and I seem to understand those well enough. Ironically enough I find the slightly more difficult reading like Pokemon games to be easier to read than the really simple manga-- mainly because they use kanji.

I picked up Yotsuba in Japanese and found it really difficult to understand because almost all of it is in Hiragana, so there’re these long strings of random sounds I don’t understand. If they were paired with Kanji and furigana on the side, it wouldn’t be a problem since I understand almost all the kanji I see. But since they’re just hiragana, I don’t recognize it. I think what kind of media you start with depends much more on your understanding of grammar than your level in WaniKani.

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It seems like teens use it a lot though. Or maybe I just hear teens who are the type to use it because they’re being loud and obnoxious :joy:
(I’m not trying to be critical, just adding an another situation where you’d hear it)

He does videos for specific characters and explains their speech patterns too. They’re fun to check out and you can learn more about various forms and what people do and don’t do.

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You disagree 100%. You disagree that I hear it in Japan? Interesting.

Here’s a thesaurus entry discussing 相変わらず and several other words.

The section for 相変わらず says 「相変わらず」は、予想や期待に反して、現在が過去と変わっていないことを表わす。

Nothing there about it being specific to fiction or anime or anything. Thesauruses will tell you when words fall into specific categories, like slang, formal, etc.

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I think it’s rather absurd to leverage your anecdotal experience as if it’s objective fact, especially considering that 相変わらず is considered a common word in JDict, and searching on google.jp returns 230 million results. I could stay in Japan for 10 years and never hear the word for turmeric (うこん), but that doesn’t mean the word doesn’t exist, nor does it really tell you anything about whether the word is common or not.

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I also live in Japan (just over a year) and I hear this word quite often. Soo…

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That’d be a challenge for Leebo, considering he’s already there.

You’ve already clearly demonstrated that your “experiences” largely consists of you parroting what people around you use without understanding why they use it. You could probably stand to Google a few things every now and then yourself.

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