How are you watching Japanese Media?

Hey, you’re right! We took it down because we agreed that it goes against the guidelines’ stance on sharing illegal material.

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I think that has more to do with speech quirks (like ending sentences with にゃ or げそ or weird things like that), and also inappropriate politeness levels (anime characters often always speak a certain way as a character trait, for example a character always speaking politely even to friends, or rude characters that never speak politely even when they should). And of course, you shouldn’t copy the anime girl high pitch voice, but I guess that’s more obvious. xD I think as long as you also listen to more conversational speech you should be fine. In terms of vocabulary, you can learn tons of useful words from anime and other media.

Subscribe to TV Japan if you can afford it. It costs me $25 USD a month on Direct TV. It’s all Japanese and I love it. Good programming and Japanese subtitles.

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That’s exactly why I got on to TV Japan!

I didn’t know direct tv had a Japanese package, that’s kinda neat. If I ever end up paying for my own satellite tv I’ll definitely check it out.

Appreciate the second opinion! I still think there’s value in using anime to practice I just don’t know that I’m at the point where I can tell what is an “animeism” or if it’s just normal in regular speech. I definitely find myself second guess sometimes. This likely won’t be the case forever but it’s hard when I don’t hear it spoken regularly to tell those differences.

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Oh that sounds interesting!! I’m assuming you need to have directTV?

That’s a really good question! I don’t know. I’d check with whatever plan you have and ask them. I would think it’s possible that other outfits might have it. If you check it out, let me know, please.

I’m on the TV Japan site, and it says it works with Comcast, but I literally ONLY have internet. We stream everything, do you subscribe through your tv provider, or is there a streaming option that you know of? I’ll keep checking the site, but was wondering if you knew! Thank you!

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Mostly, that particular one is on satellite. That would be fine if you could pay for only the channel and not have to have at least the basic package at somewhere around an arm/leg and your first-born in terms of cost. There are some online for-pay options as well that include multiple channels, but I’m unsure of the legality of them. I know that several stations are freely aired online but region-locked, so your IP has to be in Japan to access at all. Netflix + youtube seems to be the safest bet for U.S. viewing if you don’t want to pay astronomical fees.

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Shoot. Nevermind, just found it.

In the US… Available on Cable TV, IPTV and Satellite TV ((We do not offer internet streaming service.))

I am the saddest of sad pandas right now. =(

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That being said, I did really enjoy staying up late watching TVJapan when my mom had satellite many years ago before I graduated. I even managed to catch a few samurai dramas that were quite entertaining. And a show where these guys drove a food truck around a town meeting people and collecting ingredients which they uses on the Saturday of that week to make a huge meal for all of the people involved. Educational, entertaining, and mouth watering all in one! (English translation of the title is something like ‘kitchen car comes to town’, though that was a very loose interpretation…)

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Yes, I subscribe through my TV provider. When I realized I needed more listening practice, I messaged them on my computer and got it added to my TV package. I had it in 5 minutes after talking with them.

Yeah, satellite is expensive!! Thank heaven, I’m in a position where I can get the basic package and TV Japan. I scrimp on other things sometimes to get it, but it is worth it to learn a little more Japanese. And I’m learning more about Japanese food, geography, history, music, etc., not to mention just having fun watching some of the programs.

Hey you are 100% correct that alot of these words are definitely not used in normal conversation. Those people in here that act confused by that statement are simply extremely ignorant. Back to the point though yes analyzing true natural conversation is key, I like the podcast listening idea someone wrote. Here’s the deal, on jp tv there are 9 channels free, and public for everyone to watch. 1 & 2 are NHK, I don’t really like em that much. But the top show in Japan that would feature natural conversation is matsuko deluxe. I’ll get the exact title later. So when I asked her about this she said that if you were in America you may be able to subscribe to nhks tv content and somehow watch it all, however not sure. And that does not include matsuko. So the real question is how could one in America legally or illegally obtain every currently aired episode of matsuko deluxe’s show for the purpose of studying natural japanese conversation? I will look further into this and report back.

Ok i found some stuff. But I basically had to search in all japanese. The key is you don’t want to be viewing or listening to conversations that are over nuanced or overly advanced etc. Cuz that just won’t be relevant to us basic japanese speakers so that being said, I remove all, movies, and animes. That leaves only basic local shows and podcasts. YouTube the clips are too short and don’t have long enough episodes, therefore not enough context. I found this on Amazon. https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/B00OMSZEN4

Not sure if it’s relevant. But so matsuko had or has 2 shows please also try some searching around and see what you can find.
Here are the names:

“マツコの知らない世界” and “マツコ会議”

And for those of you who don’t know about matsuko you need to get with the modern times. Yes it’s a drag queen person. But matsuko is the most popular person and voice and successful person, and has been for well over 5 years straight now. Everyone cares what this person says. She is not overly political, but says what she thinks, she is quite entertaining, charismatic, and interesting. Check her out. Definitely.

Yeah that might be worth it for me. What type of shows do they have?

They have everything pretty much. I don’t watch all day, of course, but I know they have loads of entertaining kids’ programming, sumo, sports (usually on the weekends), movies ( lots of historical movies as well as others), cooking, travel, music, “Cool Japan”, which talks about all kinds of things Japan is famous for and different from other countries, news, instructional programs (such as what to do in an earthquake, Japanese for kids and adults, medical) etc. It’s NHK programming. One of my favorite shows is “Chatty Jay’s Sundry Shop”, which is a kid’s show with puppets, and it is lots of fun! Anyway, I have learned a lot about Japan and learned some language as well, so for me, TV Japan is well worth the price.

But so matsuko had or has 2 shows
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I think Matsuko is on NHK. I’m not sure but I think I have watched this program.

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I"m watching Japanese media with a dose of headache medication nearby lol

(Basically I watch it with Japanese audio and English subtitles but everything goes very fast and I am not very good yet so I only do it in highly motivated 30 minute chunks before switching to English media with English audio and English subtitles. Oops. Although in my defense I’m also hearing impaired so the whole thing really is just…a lot. I much prefer reading practice.)

What kind of words do you mean?

There are words that no one in polite Japanese society would use that do appear in Anime (お前 comes to mind).

I can speak for お前 because I went to Japan for work and had interesting conversations with the people I work with. We talked about Anime and they asked… “you use words like お前 when you speak in Japanese?”

Other than the fact that I can barely speak Japanese, I also learned early to be polite which unless you are in super comfortable situations with folks or are really trying to be mean, お前 simply wouldn’t be used.

And while not word specific, Japanese Man Yuta had this interesting (to me) video about Anime vs Real Life Japanese.