Going slow. It's okay

The internet has become such a sensitive and wishy-washy place that simply contradicting or correcting someone is seen as hostility or toxicity. God forbid you actually disapprove of someone or something and don’t couch your ire in “bless your heart”-style understatement or victim statements. From a sociological standpoint it’s fascinating to see how what was once a kind of crazy wild west is conforming to traditional upper class cultural norms.

5 Likes

Well played sir. You know alot for sure.

1 Like

not just the internet…society…

which i guess now is the internet…one and the same.

4 Likes

It’s true… “Snowflake generation” comes to mind.

People avoid to defend their arguments just because they feel offended and you automatically become racist or homophobic or patriarchal or Nazi :man_facepalming:

5 Likes

If I didn’t have a lifetime subscription I’d never get through this.

3 Likes

Just thought it could be fun for someone who clicks on this looking for affirmation to know about the :durtle_hello: Let’s Durtle the Scenic Route :turtle: thread :caught_durtling:

5 Likes

If this thread is “very negative”, then what do you call threads where there are real fights and name-calling? Exaggeration and hyperbole can also be interpreted as toxic if you stretch the definition enough.

3 Likes

I call them “this thread” you big poopyhead

4 Likes

Agree. They should’ve used internet back in early 2000’s. Everyone was told to kill themselves on a near daily basis and everyone did everyones mom and it was nothing like now. Simply being honest with people is impossible, because they will find some contorted way of being offended, even if they aren’t even targeted in any way. If you are offended, chances are that you just need to grow up.

3 Likes

Oh! A meta-joke! Nice job doodoo-nose

1 Like

1,000% agree with every word in this comment.

2 Likes

At least in the real world there aren’t people with magical powers who can silence or erase you with the click of a button, and there’s still the sense that a lot of space is public or at least “open” and it’s not reasonable to silence people in those spaces. On the internet, everything is considered private even if it’s an open forum (like this one, but there are a million examples) and all those private spaces have thought police.

1 Like

Crying victim, character assassination, and appealing to exaggerated civility standards to silence people is pretty toxic, yeah

It’s not the goal, it’s the path you choose

2 Likes

Don’t be sad because it’s over, be happy because it happened.

1 Like

Thanks for this. I recently reset my level from 10 back to 5 because I fell behind. I was caught up in trying to level up that I ended up having trouble remembering earlier vocabulary/kanji. This time I am slowing things down and giving myself enough time to absorb what I’m currently studying before advancing and you know what? I’m retaining the material better now.
For everyone on here, it’s not a race if you wish to slow your pace. We all learn at different speeds and that’s okay <3

4 Likes

You should always choose the method that suits you best. If you’re one of those people who are able to make good progress while taking it slow, then go for it. If you’re one of those natural procrastinators ,like I am, then I don’t think this mindset necessarily works for you. For me, If I don’t push myself every day to do my daily learning routine and maybe even take longer breaks, I feel myself getting more and more lazy. It’s extremely difficult for me to get back into the workflow when that happens.

4 Likes

This is a good post for people who tend to start off studying strong and then quit because they burn themselves out. One of the most important factors in learning a language is consistent study. Daily study. Exercising your mind is like exercising your body. If you overdo it, you will stop reaping benefits and start seeing negative consequences. You don’t have to compare yourself to others and feel pressure. Think about your own language goals, your own limits and responsibilities, and plan wisely. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

7 Likes
1 Like

I feel very heard with this post ! I recently started (again) WK after a pause of 2 long years, and the start-up was very long. I had this idea in mind to start again with 20 lessons per days + reviews, but my brain couldn’t keep up. Starting very slowly was really good, and helped me enjoy WK again without feeling pressured about it :slight_smile:

Yeah … And sometimes your ability to learn changes. For me, stress at work was a huge factor in my need to slow down my japanese studies. I couldn’t remember anything anymore :sweat:

1 Like