Everyday Phrases that Don't Translate Well

So this is just someone that I realized I need to know cause I talk Japanese everyday at work but I find there are phrases/grammars that are very common but because I never studied them there is no way I would know or translate in my head very well.
The phrase that started this was 布団を新しくしたから気持ちいい。
Because I did the futon new it is comfortable? No it means “I got a new futon…” like what? haha I get it now but yeah.

Any other phrases or grammars that would be helpful for someone in Japan to know?

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お願いします

And I dont just mean the basic usage that everyone learns on their first week. I mean knowing the usage that seems to show up in literally every social interaction at work.

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You sure you don’t mean よろしくおねがいします? :slightly_smiling_face:

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Hm? Isn’t that pretty close to what it literally says, though? I feel good because I made my futon new, i.e., “I replaced it?”

It’s using this rule.

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yes im sure

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I take it japanese is your second language, but translations are rarely very straight forward, it’s all over the place.

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頼む - when asking someone for a favor casually
お疲れ様です - greetings when coming to work
お先に失礼します and the short お先に - when leaving work before others

Edit: hot dayum, I just realized @plantron さん is almost level 40 now :smiley:

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:sweat_smile:

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The more immersion I get, the more I realize that the things you learn the first week, like する=“to do”, are woefully simplistic representations. But they’re a start.

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[Noun]を[Place]に 忘れた。 = I left noun in place.

忘れる means ‘to forget’ but it’s often used as ‘to forget to bring something’.

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“I forgot my wallet at the store”

It translates perfectly, actually lol

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Both “I left [noun] in [place]” and “I forgot [noun] in [place]” are natural in English. (And can be used the way 忘れる means)

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