Do you remember the number of strokes? Do you use SKIP? -- My solution was created, plus stroke orders


#1

Do you remember the number of strokes? Do you search by SKIP code?

Also, what about multiple radical Kanji input?

If you do, how do you remember the number of strokes – for faster searching?

I was grown up not using OCR properly, sorry. Writing Kanji in Kanji dictionary by hand sometimes is not working.

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Edit: I now create Anki decks with stroke orders:
Based on Jisho.org, I created Anki decks to remember “Stroke count”, for my personal use. Total 252 cards.


There will be stroke orders with appropriate font / in Anki version.

Spreadsheet version: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17hzwbhorXl7XJuj0xkfNhj-w7nCvky4O53rHyvCbgf4/edit?usp=sharing
Anki version: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ztkua67tlz6u4ar/Jisho-strokes.apkg?dl=0
Sample:

Anki settings: 1 10 240 480 1440 4320 (Almost similar to WaniKani), with the tag: 1-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8-10, 11-17, to aid in creating filtered deck.

//↓I’ve decided that to do this one below might pointless, though.

I also created an official radicals’ version, totaling 2192 cards, but I won’t do that one yet. It is way too large. Also tagged by a group of about 40-200 cards each.
Anki: https://www.dropbox.com/s/k24ygktmt4r4wht/Official-radical-strokes.apkg?dl=0


#2

What? I don’t think anyone remembers number of strokes; why would you do that?


#3

For being faster at typing an unknown Kanji, with unknown reading.


#4

Neither…Google OCR is OP. Though I saw someone mention KanjiTomo in another thread, so I downloaded that and think it’ll be useful for various things for sure.


#5

i dont remember the number of strokes necessarily, but if i see a kanji i can go through the stroke order and count them. i use skip sometimes but sometimes i miscount the number of strokes and then its a pain


#6

Using a paperback Kanji dictionary a lot might be bigger pain.


#7

Articles from Tofugu that I found by searching “kanji.” Ordered by most relevant.

  1. How to guess a Kanji’s stroke order
  2. How to look up and read kanji you don’t know
  3. Skritter: a great way to great practice kanji, stroke order
  4. How to find the kanji radical

All articles written by Koichi, except the last one.


#8

I was really into SKIP until the radicals from WK really began sticking. Now when I do reviews I think of radicals instead of SKIP because I will and do write them by hand. It helps me remember the overall form more.

As for searching, I just look up the radicals and I guess I count the strokes in my head. I don’t memorize them. OH! I’ll write the character by hand in the air to help me count the strokes. __φ(..)


#9

Sameish as @ShotgunLagoon + radicals (I started my Japanese adventure with RTK, so breaking kanji down into components is my first instinct) (It also makes it easier to guess at stroke count if I have to, incidentally).

That dictionary is a blessing, honestly. If I’m VERY stumped, though, or if I’m trying to read a character written with handwriting I can’t confidently parse enough to recreate it/guess at the component, then I go to this wiki page here after guesstimating a rough stroke count and start hunting. Actually works pretty well. I’m usually accurate to within one stroke, and since I’m looking for a particular structure it narrows down what I’m looking at very quickly.

I definitely don’t use SKIP. It looks terrifying.


#10

Yeah, I see no reason to memorize kanji stroke numbers, you can tell by looking at it if you know how to follow kanji writing rules.


#11

Based on Jisho.org, I created Anki decks to remember “Stroke count”, for my personal use. Total 252 cards.

Spreadsheet version: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17hzwbhorXl7XJuj0xkfNhj-w7nCvky4O53rHyvCbgf4/edit?usp=sharing
Anki version: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ztkua67tlz6u4ar/Jisho-strokes.apkg?dl=0
Sample:

Anki settings: 1 10 240 480 1440 4320 (Almost similar to WaniKani), with the tag: 1-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8-10, 11-17, to aid in creating filtered deck.

//↓I’ve decided that to do this one below might pointless, though.

I also created an official radicals’ version, totaling 2192 cards, but I won’t do that one yet. It is way too large. Also tagged by a group of about 40-200 cards each.
Anki: https://www.dropbox.com/s/k24ygktmt4r4wht/Official-radical-strokes.apkg?dl=0


#12

That’s a lot of cards. It would be useful to remember the stroke order, it would help you write.

Writing kanji has a fluidity to it that English doesn’t. I have practiced writing kanji calligraphy with large brush strokes before and it is very relaxing… but difficult!

This is from a famous caligrapher.

I noticed in your browser tabs the article List of kanji by concept. This is a really interesting way of organising kanji. I have always liked that kanji seem to represent concepts, I find the ambiguity more comforting.


#13

very nice! thank you for pointing out.
haha those counters, even one for tatami mats :stuck_out_tongue:

would you mind showing us some of your calligraphy? I’m really interested!

and what does it say in the one you uploaded?


#14

Last time I practiced was a long time ago! I hadn’t started WaniKani then. Sadly I don’t have any remaining pictures of it. I certainly want to pick up calligraphy again.

I was thinking of buying a 筆ペン [ふでペン] (brush pen) and some 原稿用紙 [げんこうようし] (draft paper) and write each new kanji I learn a few times. It would be very time consuming.

It says “別無工夫”, meaning “no spiritual meaning,” supposedly. I don’t see it.


#15

__φ(..)

This is the cutest thing I have ever seen I can’t. I can’t. Omg.


#16

Yay! I’m happy it helped spread some cheer (ノ´ヮ`)ノ*: ・゚
Kaomoji forever~