Can someone explain this use of particle に

I came accross a sentence

大阪に遊びに行きました。

But it is not really clear for me why I need to use two に particles. I know one of them i associated with the used of 行く; but why should I use the same particle for the place (大阪).

The book’s translation for this sentence is:

He went to Osaka to have fun.

I know if I used particle で It would be more like:

He had fun at Osaka: but that’s not what I am trying to say, really.

The book’s correct answer is the one I wrote above:

大阪に遊びに行きました。

I just want to know what is the sense of having the particle に next to Osaka. The answer as given by the book sounds OK to me; actually I gave that answer even before checking on the answer key, but it just came to me and I want to remember the logic behind this,

As always, thanks for your support guys. You all are great.

The に in 遊びに行きました is the form of saying " to go in order to do something", and it’s formed by combining the verb stem + にいく
–> 遊び (遊ぶ verb stem) + にいく = “to go in order to have fun”

The に next to 大阪 is used as a directional particle, being used to give information of the motion of the verb, so this specifies that he went to Osaka in order to have fun

Using で would be more of a contextual particle if you were to use it here, giving us extra info of where the action is taking place, so it would be more like “In Osaka, he went to have fun”

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Having the same particle show up many times in a sentence might be confusing but like mentioned above, it’s just referring to “to” Osaka. I already began to write something as @Missmisc replied and now I feel like I have to post something. Here are more examples I guess… sorry

ジム通う。Go to the gym.
買いに行く。Go to the store to buy.
友達のうち遊びに行く。Go to a friends house (visit/play)
歯医者電話する。Call to the dentist.

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:see_no_evil: ごめんね !

Yeah, and to make it a little clearer for OP, this happens but you’ll notice that the particle can serve different purposes, so even though the same particle shows up, it can have different functions

In the example, the two にs are serving different purposes: the first に is indicating the target of our motion verb, and the second に is indicating the purpose of action

So essentially, the construction of “に~(verb stem)に行く” = “to go to a place in order to”

大阪に遊びに行きました --> “Went to Osaka in order to have fun”

Okay I think I’m done now :durtle_the_explorer:

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Excellent, thanks a lot. Your comments made this a lot more clear. Thanks to everyone else as well.

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You can avoid the first に by substituting へ. Can’t do that for the second に though.

I’ve typically thought of it as に is towards something while で is at something…if that makes any sense. Though I don’t know if that’s right.

Yeah I guess you can think of it like that. There are exceptions of course. Like how when talking about where something or someone is/exists, ある、いる would be used and not で。

I don’t really know how much that helps unless someone already understands the difference, because at and towards can be the same thing.

Yeah I guess you can think of it like that. There are exceptions of course. Like how when talking about where something or someone is/exists, にある、にいる would be used and not で。

Well that still makes sense to me, as existence is being given towards something rather than at something.

I don’t really know how much that helps unless someone already understands the difference, because at and towards can be the same thing.

I suppose it is a bit vague still. I understand で as “at” when referring to a place or time and に as “towards” when an action is being driven towards something but not acted upon something as を would be.
…That probably makes less sense, but it works in most cases I’ve seen.

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Don’t forget the “through” usage of を, as in 公園を歩く :slight_smile:

(just to make things more complicated, haha)

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Oh Japanese, why are you this way? :weary:

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This is what I’ve used to understand the distinction between the two, though I’m sure there are exceptions to these rules:
image
image

hope these help!

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is this picture from a certain website or something? curious if theres others like it, useful!

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