Are Japanese and Chinese actually the easiest languages?

I came across this video and I think it raises a lot of points that are also applicable to japanese about why mandarin is actually one of the easiest languages when you think about it. I feel like I needed to share this voice of reason to help break this perpetual myth that asian languages are somehow more difficult.

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Honestly I found Mandarin way easier to learn than Japanese. To this day, I still have to make a mental switch for SOV.

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(for people that don’t watch the video, this is satire)

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The easiest language is silence (as my brother always reminds me when I talk too much) :sweat_smile:

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That jab at xiaomanyc

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LMAO…this guy is a sarcastic little shit and I love him

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I heard that learning to speak backwards is easier & more likely to be helpful to your life. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

We should all abandon WK and learn this at once :wink:

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If memes were a language, you would be fluent. :joy:

Yeah, that guy’s schtick got old really fast.

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The american alphabet is indeed the hardest to learn.

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Not to be confused with the much easier British alphabet

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Which I’m pretty sure they copied from us Americans in the first place.

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Thanks for this post, I needed it today.

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If that’s the case than what the heck is up with the Encyclopædia Britannica? :wink:

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Everyone can learn Japanese too!
(I am not a Haider :sweat_smile: but this is so cute)

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日本語上手

Pitch accent on point.

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The simplicity of Kanji and the superiority of fewer sound are already cover in the video. What can we add for Japanese ?

  1. No space between words
    American spelling is such a disaster that we have to put spaces between words to tell them apart. But no need for them in Japanese thanks to phonetic hiragana and kanji (which are much easier than alphabet as already established). It’s much more compact and efficient to read.

  2. No pronouns.
    American overcomplicates everything with pronouns I eat, you eat, he/she/it/xe/xem/xyr/ze/hir/hirs/ey/em/eir/ eat, we eat, they eat… None of that in Japanese, it’s super easy and simple, eat, eat, eat, eat, eat

  3. Onomatopoeia. Japanese is full of them, much more than American.
    Which help a lot because onomatopoeias are the simplest thing in the world, literally 6 months baby can do them. You just listen to what stuff do and do the same with your mouth. Like something is spinning and it does like kurukuru, just say it with your mouth and voila, you already know the word for spinning.

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The letter æ makes things easier since you know that it was definitely written in the British alphabet and not any other alphabet, whereas you can’t tell the American and Mexican alphabets apart when you’re talking about piñatas

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I unironically think, that japanese is one of the easiest languages to learn, from a pure grammatical point of view. The thing that makes japanese so difficult is, that it uses Kanji, and everything that comes with it.
Tons and tons of homophones, words that have the exact same reading and are only different because of the kanji they use.

If the japanese language were to use different readings for most words, then I think it would be near the top of easy languages to learn.

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Funny enough I think the kanji is the easiest part!

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Yeah no, I don’t mean the kanji themselves. Once you got a basic grasp of how kanji works, I think they become managable, and I do like kanji.

What I mean is the result of japanese using Kanji (i.e the homophones). In reading, that’s easy peasy, because they are written differently, but in speaking and listening, that’s a different thing entirely.
Tell me what I mean when I say かける without any kanji to help you, for example.