About answering swiftly

While reviewing, do you prefer to think before answering or do you write the answer which flashes in your mind?

At first, i was thinking, trying to recall everything and answer them to increase my hit rate. After reaching lvl 6 i inverted my strategy. Now when i see question, as soon as i type the first answer which pops into my mind. At first, my hit rate dropped dramatically. After a while, in benefit, I review more and began to recognize kanjis faster due to more repetition. After changing my strategy, i am able to follow japanese text on youtube, and read nhk news faster. Also as a bonus, long reviewing queues finishes in a short time.

What is your opinion?

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That’s what reading does for me.
I definitely don’t want my accuracy to drop because I’m hasty.

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Gotta go fast. :wink:

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I noticed that the first thing that pops in my mind is more often than not the correct one. If I stop and try to think and then change my answer, I realize I should’ve gone with the first option.

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I try to look at the kanji and get the meaning and reading no matter what it’s asking (for apprentice stuff) but I don’t jump on answers, except if I do know it, and if there’s something that I can’t remember, I will spend a few minutes racking my brain, first of because I don’t want to get it wrong, and that if you do manage to remember it after reaaaaaallllly thinking about it (again, apprentice stuff) then it feels great and it sticks better

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Until now, I used to type the first thing I remembered but my accuracy dropped because of that. And all those items went back to apprentice and it was a real pain to get the items back to guru or more. Instead of concentrating on the new items I had a lot of old ones too and everything got blurry.
So now I try to take it as easy as I can, be sure I can remember everything right. And be sure I don’t have typos. For me, it matters more to really understand an item and remembering it right than getting to lvl 60.I am a slug!

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To me, part of being effective in a language is instant recall. I think it’s crucial for both input and output. As a result, I try to hammer through cards as quickly as possible - just making sure I’m actually typing correct what I have in my mind.

For sure if I don’t know something in ~5 seconds or it’s not on the verge of recollection, I’ll intentionally fail the card and relearn it.

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exact same as you. Usually its a little slower for the first couple SRS intervals but after that I just try to go quickly.

For the newest apprentice items that I’ve learned recenty I’ll try to be more careful, if I can’t instantly recognize it the item, I’ll try to trace back the mnemonic in my head.

But when I get a large batch of older items, then I just go all out with the first thing that comes to mind!

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Yeah, it also depends on how far along your Japanese studies you are.

If you’re learning kanji first, with no grammar or listening in mind, then you can take your time.

But if you’re already at the point when quick recall is important, then that’s that.

Not really much of a point in knowing a lot of vocab, if you’re speaking with someone and take a minute to parse every other word. :slight_smile:

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I agree with @Kazzeon with the ‘what point of learning you are at’
I also think that people put too much stress on your stats, I think It should not matter to you if your accuracy goes down if it means you are able to put it to use more quickly.more efficiently

I whole heatedly agree with your method personally, but I think different people learn in different ways, so it is really trying to find the best way for you to learn, and if that means experimenting and your stats dropping for a little bit… so be it

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I agree, and do the same.

First I try to recall the mnemonics, and to some extent if I have the time, I make the effort. Sometimes it pays off, but not so often. So in the end it takes a lot of time and also frustrates me more when I fail.

The best thing of a low success rate is precisely that you start giving a shit about it, and then you realize you just get faster and it never goes thaaaat low (I think the worst was about 75), and it normally goes up again.

My motivation is higher if I’m fast:dash:

I don’t wait too long before typing in the answer. Most of the time this works just fine. When I notice that my accuracy level is dropping, it’s a sign for me that I’m getting tired/sleepy/drunk. So I stop doing reviews and catch me some z’s.

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I try to answer so fast as I can
but i score better if i answer slowly

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It’s totally ok to have to think about an answer. If you can’t instantly recall a kanji, remember the mnemonic. It’s why we have them. That said, don’t sit and think about it for an obscene about of time. How one defines “an obscene amount of time” is up to the individual, however.

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Sometimes I take some time to think about it, but usually I answer immediately.

Sometimes I start typing an answer, and while my hands are typing my brain starts to say “wait maybe this isn’t right” but by the time that message gets to my hands I’ve already pressed enter.

This is why I have the ignore button now.

If i have the time, I’ll try my best to recall the answers (which would take longer) but usually I’m pressed for time so I just bulldoze it :joy:

Its the things that come back as enlightened/burn that i tend to make careless mistakes on :exploding_head:

I often need to trust what I initially think the answer is, cos I find if I think too much about it I answer incorrectly?? it’s odd

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Always have to get down to business right away when doing reviews since I’m often crazy busy, so I’m always gonna say that I have to answer as swift as the coursing river.

original
yes i’m sorry, I mostly replied because I couldn’t resist making a disney reference

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Language learning is akin to developing an instinct. At some point you want to speak/read/write without thinking much. So you might as well hone that instict.

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