Weird little study habits?

Haha, that’s a great idea! Sadly don’t have anyone in my friend group who’s learning Japanese, but a good idea to keep in mind!

And in regards to them learning these things quickly, it just shows that you are amazing at teaching!

Thanks for sharing!

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my friends are not voluntarily learning japanese, I make them do it. :wink: But than again they teach me subjects that I wouldn’t normally care about, so it’s a win-win.

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Love the idea! Guess it’s time to force feed my friends some Japanese! :slight_smile:

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Not necessarily a study habit, but I teach random bits of Japanese to my brother, so that he can throw them at his Japanese friends just to blow their minds :joy:

Also, I like talking like a 8yo anime girl in Japanese.

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Can confirm

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Haha, I can just imagine their reactions! Same as you, @Candygaming also uses teaching to supplement their studies, I think that’s a great idea!

Well, you just gave me the perfect idea to disturb my neighbours when I’m studying in my yard! :joy:

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You’re obviously just way better at explaining them than the material you used to learn them :laughing:

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Same here. Especially onomatopoeias can be really confusing at most times so I still look them up even though I know what they mean.

Weird study habit (or the lack thereof): I never studied grammar officially (except for difference between は and が) but I do catch up the patterns due to exposure (manga, anime). So I don’t really know the groupings of verbs, adjectives and nouns in japanese. I want to think I still study grammar by more exposure and more reading. When I cannot understand what I read anymore, I just use google translate (which gives me a vague idea of who’s doing who, to what, to where, often correct but not all the time) and learn the grammar pattern from there.

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I’m the opposite! I forget every history based vocab my boyfriend teaches me!

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I’m not sure it’s a weird study habit per se, but during this Coronavirus lockdown a close friend of mine picked Korean study back up again to fill time, and we’ve gotten into a nice routine of having almost daily discussions about what new things she’s learnt. She’s described those sessions as being really helpful to reinforce what she’s learning because she’s having to explain them to me, someone who can’t speak any Korean, and I’m able to provide different perspectives with the Japanese equivalents (or differences) in grammar and of course we can both compare against English.

I noticed pretty quickly that it’s been beneficial to my own study because her explanations are encouraging me go back to grammar that I learnt a long time ago to delve deeper into the nuances etc. When she’s a bit further in and more confident in her ability to understand what she’s reading we plan to start a little book club where we read the same thing, her in Korean and me in Japanese, so we can discuss the differences in approach to language used for the same scenes etc. We’re hoping to wrangle in another friend who is learning French so we can get a third perspective.

Otherwise, writing everything down. I struggle most with understanding, not necessarily cultural contexts for words, but words that can be used in different ways than they would be in English - I think my most recent was seeing 落ちる used to refer to failing a test. Whenever I see something in the wild, it goes in a notebook where I can write down the word and the context etc, with an example sentence. It doesn’t necessarily help my retention immediately but I’ll flick through those books routinely to reinforce. Eventually it helps. :sweat_smile:

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That’s an amazing idea! I had never even thought about reinforcing language learning by comparing it to other languages! It’s a really great idea to make you think deeper about the grammar and little nuances and such!

Same thing for the notebook, I have a lot of digital notes and documents for all kinds of things I encounter in the wild, but those are limited to when I’m at home and I don’t really read through them enough. Switching to one physical notebook seems like a great idea!

Thank you for sharing!

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Attending a Japanese school right now in Japan so all my friends and I like to force feed each other random Kanji, vocab, or grammar to each other :slight_smile:

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I’m not sure if these count as study habits, but they’re things I do when studying sooo… xD I can’t really do it when I’m on mobile though… :<
But recently when I’m studying at home, I always play this music to help keep me focused. I thought the kaleidoscope effect might be distracting but it gets pretty boring pretty quick, so I can fullscreen it. Then I study as long as I can, sometimes upwards of an hour! Eventually, over a few days, the video ends and I have assurance that I studied 3 hours at home and I can start the video again!
I dunno, having that visible marking of the passage of time as well as music that doesn’t distract me helps things stick a lot better I think.

As for a not so focused thing, I’ve been making more of an effort to actually read things, even if they’re very simple and I’ve known it for a while. I picked up a flyer at my work the other day and read the whole thing and only came across one kanji I didn’t know! I wouldn’t have known I could understand all of it if I hadn’t just picked it up on whim! :partying_face:

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I love reading about everyone’s habits! It’s something I’ve always been interested in. I write in a journal everyday, and recently I started writing the first paragraph in Japanese. I keep my notebook next to me so I can try to incorporate new vocabulary or grammar points I’ve been studying.

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That’s a really great idea! I do write out a lot of Japanese sentences to practice, but I’m always “bound” by what grammar or vocab I’m currently studying. Enjoying a bit of writing about whatever would allow for more incorporation of already known grammar and vocab.

Thanks for sharing!

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This is a cool question. I do a lot of listening practice, and put on slice-of-life shows I’ve watched before on without the subtitles, and sometimes without the video. Slice-of-life is good for this because the vocab is limited to school terms, and the characters tend to talk slowly. I think this is unusual because I still don’t do reading practice, aside from some example sentences on wanikani or the ingredients list on Japanese food products. I think this is gratifying because it lets me suss out subtle meanings behind word choices, since I’m already familiar with the characters on the shows I watch. It also feels great when I understand conversations, because I know they’re being said at a native speed.

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My weird study habit is buying too many notebooks and then only writing a few pages of notes in each of them.

Sometimes this helps me categorize my learning. Sometimes it makes my notes too scattered.

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My weird habit is writing down kanji/vocab on small pieces of paper (e.g. post-its) the first time I encounter them, and then never looking at those pieces of paper again :sweat_smile:

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I write my class notes in a notebook, and just go front to back, no organization at all. And I never read it back, honestly.

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I watch boring documentaries for my classes while doing my reviews, meaning that neither the reviews nor the documentiries get my full attention :grimacing:

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